iCubed

Fall 2012 STEAM Illustrations

One of the objectives of ICubed is to inform the UCF Community about scientific concepts. The project is meeting this objective by funding the STEAM Gallery Initiative which is an activity that encourages STEM researchers to expand their thinking and find ways to communicate their science to non-STEM audiences. In Fall 2012, the ICubed team relied on previous experiences to create artwork for the gallery. Through STEAM, UCF STEM faculty researchers who received grant supplements for their students, interacted with faculty and students in the School of Visual Arts and Design (SVAD). Participating Art and Design students attended a 3-week long seminar, as part of their course of study, and created science-inspired art based on the STEM researcher's explanations of science concepts and possibilities. In this ICubed Initiative, Visual Arts students were able to find new creative ways to communicate the science through their art. In Fall 2012, the STEAM Initiative, in addition to incorporating the STEAM activities into existing sculpture and painting courses, successfully collaborated with the instructor and students in the Illustration class. A number of artwork created during these 3 seminars was preserved for the STEAM Gallery travelling exhibition, displaying science inspired art. ICubed invited two STEM researchers in Wanda Ortiz's Intermediate Illustration class. Costas Efthimiou and his ICubed Fellow Chris Frye (Department of Physics) focused their talk on the understanding of static equilibrium. The presentation lasted approximately 30 minutes and was followed by a 15 minutes interactive discussion.

NSF

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No.0963146. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

UCF

Industrial Bypass - Brittany Broder

This piece, Industrial Bypass, plays off of the ideas of force, motion, emotion and equilibrium. I drew inspiration for this piece from the physics and engineering courses I have taken at UCF. The idea of pulleys and equilibrium derives from Engineering Analysis Statics while the content myself ripping out my own heart via pulleys is meant to represent the time my father had a heart attack. This piece is meant to give back control to the portrait of myself when the real me had no control over the situation of being in a foreign country while my father going through a double bypass. It is up to the user to pull the chord to rip out the portraits heart in an attempt to give them the same level of control.

This work was inspired by a presentation on pseudoscience and physics in art by Physicist Dr. Costas Efthimiou and informal discussions with him in Assistant Professor Wanda Raimundi-Ortiz' Drawing Fundamentals II class, Fall 2012.

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Still Jump - Carly Downey

When asked to work with motion and the human body I knew that I wanted to capture a moment of motion frozen in time. I also knew that I wanted to bring together both 3D and 2D aspects to my piece and also different materials. The materials used were wood, paint, metal wire, pre-plastered gauze, and white charcoal. When I worked with the material I wanted it to have a flow that would blend the 3D and 2D aspects; to do this I molded then painted the 3D body parts in white paint and drew the 2D body parts in white charcoal. When people experience the piece I would hope that they see the motion the body is making and force it has in order to perform that movement so that they can better understand how the body moves when put through different motions.

This work was inspired by a presentation on pseudoscience and physics in art by Physicist Dr. Costas Efthimiou and informal discussions with him in Assistant Professor Wanda Raimundi-Ortiz' Drawing Fundamentals II class, Fall 2012.

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Suspended - Carly Racer

For this piece I really wanted to capture the beauty within a single moment. I was very inspired by the aerial ribbon dancers and their ability to create a beautiful composition out of each routine. My goal was to take a single moment within a routine and suspend it not only in air, but in time as well. I wanted to illustrate how gravity and anatomy work together not only artistically but also scientifically. Gravity is defined as the force that attracts a body toward the center of the earth, or toward any other physical body having mass. The skeleton is suspended between two forces. The rope holds it up, but gravity is pushing it downwards. This cohesion between gravity and human anatomy fascinated me.

This work was inspired by a presentation on pseudoscience and physics in art by Physicist Dr. Costas Efthimiou and informal discussions with him in Assistant Professor Wanda Raimundi-Ortiz' Drawing Fundamentals II class, Fall 2012.

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Freedom Machine - Stephanie Valderrama

Will power alludes to a property of the mind and an asset of acts intentionally performed. The fact that a bike cannot function without a human powering its motion intrigues me. Inevitably, as humans we aspire to exceed our standard capabilities and push them to reach superhuman levels. The time lapse blur that is created when I rush through people, places, and the power I feel growing inside me when riding a bike, feels superhuman. The bright colors in the painting emit a gradient release that evokes that extraordinary power. Behind the mystifying illusion, there are concrete explanations behind riding a bike, such as absolute momentum and Newton's Three Laws of Motion playing a major role in cycling. Being that a solid surface is vital for friction, I used a three-dimensional bike tire to show its texture. The various bike positions have an opposing reflection, varying in direction or viewing perspective. To make a simple turn a required combination of mass with its acceleration allows for an action, along with a reaction, hence the introspective balance between the bicycle riders. The encased bike positions within the spokes of the wheel show that such actions do fall into physical boundaries. We tend to get caught up with the current exhilarating sensation; we forget all of the technicalities of science that are inserted in everyday life activities.

This work was inspired by a presentation on pseudoscience and physics in art by Physicist Dr. Costas Efthimiou and informal discussions with him in Assistant Professor Wanda Raimundi-Ortiz' Drawing Fundamentals II class, Fall 2012.

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Limber - Laura Feltgen

In an attempt to capture the romantic way in which the body ripples and moves, Limber was created to emphasize on muscle tension. Originally, this graphite illustration was going to be based on aerial yoga; marrying fabric and forces. However, the fabric in aerial yoga tends to provide more support and hide the muscles that I wanted to illustrate. Therefore, I shifted my attention to a pole dancer's performance after learning that the same muscles are utilized. After enrolling in a Yoga Girls Orlando class, I was able to understand just how phenomenal the human body is. My illustration shows the dancer resting at a laborious position, demonstrating various concepts in physics such as consolation of forces and torques.

This work was inspired by a presentation on pseudoscience and physics in art by Physicist Dr. Costas Efthimiou and informal discussions with him in Assistant Professor Wanda Raimundi-Ortiz' Drawing Fundamentals II class, Fall 2012.

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Kitchen Samurai - Mollie Diedrich

Kitchen Samurai is not only about the forces exerted through movement, but also about the secretive character of all people. The figure is transparent and nude because he is being revealed doing something weird or embarrassing that he would never do in public. Whether it's pretending to be a warrior in your kitchen, or a superstar singing in the shower, people entertain their fantasies in many ways that they would never do when others were around. As if they feel that they are the only ones who do such things. The figure sequence is nude to show the muscle tension as the figures go through their movements. While the figure is exerting force on the sword, the sword also pushes back on the figure, causing his muscles to expand and contract, and his balance to shift in different positions. Both the sword and figure move through space, exerting force upon each other.

This work was inspired by a presentation on pseudoscience and physics in art by Physicist Dr. Costas Efthimiou and informal discussions with him in Assistant Professor Wanda Raimundi-Ortiz' Drawing Fundamentals II class, Fall 2012.

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Balancing Duo - Sierra Jill Collector

The fluid acrobatics and stunning balancing acts performed by Cirque du Soleil are represented in this piece, which demonstrates the physics of the human body in a state of static equilibrium. I chose to juxtapose the solid painted figure supporting a free-floating wire contour to emulate the weight and balance of the pose itself. The pose and medium capture both the solid and fragile nature of such a delicate position.

This work was inspired by a presentation on pseudoscience and physics in art by Physicist Dr. Costas Efthimiou and informal discussions with him in Assistant Professor Wanda Raimundi-Ortiz' Drawing Fundamentals II class, Fall 2012.

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Flawless Vision - Stephanie Nava

This artwork is a reflection of how I see the world around me. I have myopia, otherwise known as nearsightedness. This is the result of elongated eyeballs: rays of light from distant objects converge in front of the retina instead of directly on it, blurring distant objects. Lens can have different curvatures, which help rays of light to be focused directly on the retina. People who have myopia are prescribed with divergent lenses. The Mylar here represents my lenses. Remove it, and you see what I see.

This work was inspired by a presentation on pseudoscience and physics in art by Physicist Dr. Costas Efthimiou and informal discussions with him in Assistant Professor Wanda Raimundi-Ortiz' Drawing Fundamentals II class, Fall 2012.

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Tap It Off - Theresa Sanchez

I created this art work to show the movement done by the feet when tap dancing. I chose tap dancing because it is a dance that does not always require much space and involves much weight shifting it create different sounds. Originally I wanted to draw dancers in motion but chose to actually show the motions themselves which I thank my art professor for the idea. I also have a video presentation that further explains the physics behind each move and discussed how forces, kinetic, and potential energy is involved.

This work was inspired by a presentation on pseudoscience and physics in art by Physicist Dr. Costas Efthimiou and informal discussions with him in Assistant Professor Wanda Raimundi-Ortiz' Drawing Fundamentals II class, Fall 2012.

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Martial Art - Tiffany Hughes

The fluidity and constant motion of Capoeira translate how movement and rhythm unite from two separate worlds: dance and combat. Understanding biomechanics is pivotal to performing any martial art and executing a technique with maximum efficiency. Capoeira by nature relies on momentum and kinetic energy for the power in each movement, maintained by the way each move flows into the next uninterrupted, but also relies on conserving energy for the future. This is illustrated in my piece as each 'frame' represents a specific moment within a single movement and how they relate. As the two figures get closer together, they become darker and more distinct from the background of white creating a contrast that voices the energy of Capoeira. It was important that my piece invite the viewer in with its smaller scale, simulating the curiosity I felt when I saw Capoeira for the first time and was drawn in by the grace and use of energy it required.

This work was inspired by a presentation on pseudoscience and physics in art by Physicist Dr. Costas Efthimiou and informal discussions with him in Assistant Professor Wanda Raimundi-Ortiz' Drawing Fundamentals II class, Fall 2012.

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Untitled - Daniel Talvera

Pseudo science is more or less a claim which is presented as being scientific but the proponents of the idea do not actually use the scientific method or repeatable tests. Although at times this can be harmless such as the cases of palm reading and astrology pseudo science is a very real danger. Beliefs such as the unwarranted fear against vaccines, those who deny the existence of climate change have caused suffering as the result of their or others' ignorance.

This piece captures the essence of pseudo science. Several images are used to represent certain aspects of the belief and all are drawn without any real change in value. The drawing much like the ideas themselves are two dimensional, lacking depth. The upper portion shows what we cannot see when we blind ourselves to skepticism and critical thinking. How science and what we learn from it is truly a thing of beauty from the smallest microorganism to the vastness of the universe.

This work was inspired by a presentation on pseudoscience and physics in art by Physicist Dr. Costas Efthimiou and informal discussions with him in Assistant Professor Wanda Raimundi-Ortizí Drawing Fundamentals II class, Fall 2012.

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