iCubed

Fall 2010 STEAM Paintings

One of the objectives of ICubed is to inform the UCF Community about scientific concepts. The project is meeting this objective by funding the STEAM Gallery Initiative which is an activity that encourages STEM researchers to expand their thinking and find ways to communicate their science to non-STEM audiences. In Fall 2010, the ICubed team organized a pilot for creating the artwork for the gallery.

Through STEAM, UCF STEM faculty researchers who received grant supplements for their students, interacted with faculty and students in the School of Visual Arts and Design (SVAD). Participating Arts and Design students attended a 3-week long seminar, as part of their course of study, and created science-inspired art based on the STEM researcher's explanations of science concepts and possibilities. In this ICubed Initiative, Visual Arts students were able to find new creative ways to communicate science through their art. ICubed invited two STEM researchers from different departments to present their work in Carla Poindexter's Advanced Painting class.

William T. Self, Ph.D., and his ICubed Fellow Kelly Cobaugh (Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences), discussed their research involving the effect of Auranofin on the nosocomial pathogen Clostridium difficile. Dan Mapes, and his ICubed Fellow Peter Tonner (Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science), talked about their research based in simulated realities that provide a supplementary and stimulating learning experience. These presentations invited interaction between Arts & Design students, STEM researchers, and Visual Arts and Design Instructors. A few students remained behind after the conclusion of the presentations to continue animated conversations with STEM researchers.

NSF

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No.0963146. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

UCF

Adrianne Romaine

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Untitled - Lauren Feuerman and Dominique Sandoval

In our advanced painting class in the Fall of 2010, a molecular biology student and a computer science student presented and interacted with us about their undergraduate science research. Based on the computer science research we learned that coding is a language that only computers can fully interpret. After discussing this we realized that Peter's coding represented a similar way of formulating data in which we create unique formulas to memorize information. Based on these insights we decided to turn our brains into an artistic computer. The information we interpreted was about Clostridium Difficile, which Kelly, the biologist, was researching. Our idea evolved as we learned more about how two molecules that are mirror images of each react differently to the same stimuli. Using that information, we then interpreted and formulated information and statistics related to Clostridium Difficile's properties and effects in two different analogous formats; in both cases the information is intentionally visually distorted due to the reactive influences of the two 'molecules' of information represented.

Based on presentations by Computer Scientist Dan Mapes, and ICubed Fellow Peter Tonner, and on a presentation by undergraduate research student, Kali Standoff on molecular biology, Lauren Feuerman and Dominique Sandoval's diptych communicates identical information in multiple formats

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Cow in Camouflage - Masami Koshikawa

The current research is based in simulated realities that provide supplementary and stimulating learning experience. The researchers presented on the way computers function internally and also spoke of their study of 'Digital Puppetry'. The systems they design are used by interactors to control their virtual avatars to blur the line between computers and reality.

Inspired by the presentation regarding computer coding and informed by the birth of her son, Masami Koshikawa's works explore modes of reproduction in an increasingly digital era. By combining realistic and art historical painting styles which degrade into digital pixels and flat stencils Koshikawa breaks the surface of the painting and questions classical norms.

This work was created in response to a presentation and informal discussions by Computer Scientist Dan Mapes and ICubed fellow, Peter Tonner in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's advanced painting class in Fall 2010.

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Penicillin - Natasha Kinsley

The subject of both the painting and sculpture illustrate penicillin, mold, rust and cancerous skin tissue.I increased the scale of the image in a subversive attempt to be aesthetically pleasing before there is a realization that the image is actually inspired by a repulsive 'thing' growing under the sink or on someone's skin.

This work was inspired by presentations and informal discussions with biologist Dr. Linda Walters and undergraduate researcher Kali Standorf in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's advanced painting class in Fall 2010.

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Sleep Deprived and Loving It - Alea de Bengson

When Dr. Walters said sea urchins are slightly iridescent under certain light, I thought about how light can change perception. Deep in the ocean; certain colors of light are filtered out. Around 30 feet, red light is gone and we can only perceive blues and muted yellows. In this painting I have illustrated a coral reef without red light. Because the emphasis is on light and how it reflects upon the coral, I rendered the images with loose strokes of paint to suggest highlights and shadows. Further down, when light disappears, creatures and plants develop their own light. It enhances the way they look and makes them more beautiful. So I used UV ink to imitate bioluminescence. When the painting is illuminated with a black light, the coral's features are enhanced and the appearance of the painting is completely changed from how it appears under natural light.

This work was created in response to presentations and informal discussions with biologist Dr. Linda Walters and undergraduate researcher Kali Standorf in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's intermediate painting class, Fall 2010.

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Silk Purse - Paul Finch

My sculpture entitled Silk Purse is a response to some of the ethical concerns many scientists and artists have. I believe that we all are collectively responsible for the consequences of our culture. Many scientists are inspired to devote their lives to research to help solve problems within ourselves or the environment. I was struggling to better understand my own ethical responsibilities as a painter and sculptor. I ran across a discarded chair, and stretched a canvas onto it to show that even something like a damaged and unwanted chair has potential. I wanted to show my dedication to this metaphorical object that had outlived its usefulness, so I lovingly painted its 'portrait'. I surrounded the chair with gold as an historical way to show that this is a valuable object.

This work was inspired by presentations and informal discussions with biologist Dr. Linda Walters and undergraduate researcher Kali Standorf in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's Intermediate painting class in Fall 2010.

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Sea Urchins - Slawomir Kozub

The relationship between humankind and nature has grown cold and distant. We have become disconnected from our origins-Mother Nature. The consequences of our environmental impact are evident in the land, in the water and in the sky, and until we wake up, the distance will only grow. The science lectures have given me the idea to depict an exaggeration of these consequences. This painting puts into perspective the problems present in nature. I hope that the strong negative mood will make a deep impression to the viewer who will, in turn, think of the un-repairable damage we have done to the environment.

This work was created in response to presentations and informal discussions with biologist Dr. Linda Walters and undergraduate researcher Kali Standorf in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's intermediate painting class, Fall 2010.

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