iCubed

Spring 2011 STEAM Paintings

One of the objectives of ICubed is to inform the UCF Community about scientific concepts. The project is meeting this objective by funding the STEAM Gallery Initiative which is an activity that encourages STEM researchers to expand their thinking and find ways to communicate their science to non-STEM audiences. In Spring 2011, the ICubed team relied on the Fall 2010 STEAM experiences to create artwork for the gallery.

Through STEAM, UCF STEM faculty researchers who received grant supplements for their students, interacted with faculty and students in the School of Visual Arts and Design (SVAD). Participating Arts and Design students attended a 3-week long seminar, as part of their course of study, and created science-inspired art based on the STEM researcher's explanations of science concepts and possibilities. In this ICubed Initiative, Visual Arts students were able to find new creative ways to communicate science through their art. A number of artwork created during these seminars was preserved for the STEAM Gallery, a travelling exhibition displaying science inspired art. ICubed invited two STEM researchers from different departments to present their work in Carla Poindexter's Advanced Painting class.

Dr. Linda Walters and her Undergraduate Research Assistant Kali Standorf (Department of Biology), talked about the human impact in the marine environment and the recruitment and dispersal of the long-spined sea urchin Diadema antillarum. Dr. Costas Efthimiou and his Undergraduate Research Assistant Christopher Frye (Department of Physics), focused their presentation on quantum mechanics and talked about several famous artists who used math and physics concepts in their art. Each presentation lasted approximately 30 minutes followed by a 15 minutes long discussion.

NSF

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No.0963146. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

UCF

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Sea Urchins - Emily Daniels

I have been involved with STEAM for three different projects so far, this painting is from my first experience with STEAM in Fall 2010. After hearing the research and work that marine biologist Dr. Linda Walters and her under graduate researcher Kali Standorf did concerning mass sea urchin die-offs and current populations I found myself drawn to the ecological impact such seemingly miniscule creatures can have, and how unaware many people, myself included, were of this issue. I decided to create a seascape showing how this could have occurred and been ignored. I talked over details with Kali about the varying appearances of the urchins before and after death and then I set about making a scene that allowed the viewer to appreciate the natural beauty of the underwater environment at the cost of literally overlooking a visual field of death. Through this painting I was able to create and capture a realistic scene which does not exist in a distinct place to be photographed and I have used it to direct the viewer’s attention to the matter at hand.

This work was created in response to presentations and informal discussions with biologist Dr. Linda Walters and undergraduate researcher Kali Standorf in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's intermediate painting class, Fall 2010.

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Adrianne Romaine

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The Golden Ratio - Emily Southall

The Golden Ratio (known by the Greek letter Phi) is an irrational mathematical constant (1.6180339887...) that is encountered in many mathematical and artistic constructions. For example: It is used to calculate the proportions of the human head and hand and it appears in the Fibonacci Spiral found in sea shells, pine cones and various flowers. Personally, I find the Golden Ratio intriguing because it is a function that is infinite and irrational yet it gives such order to so many aspects of nature.

This leads to the question of, what mind created these patterns and keeps them from 'spiraling' into chaos?

This work was created in response to presentations and informal discussions with Physicist Costas Efthimiou and undergraduate researcher Christopher Frye in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's intermediate painting class, Fall 2010.

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Catenary - Chelsea Ramirez

In physics and geometry, the catenary is the curve that an idealized hanging chain or cable assumes under its own weight when supported only at its ends. The curve depicts a U-like shape, emphasizing the weight of the chain. It is my observation that drapery, like a chain, acts in a similar manner. In my drawings, paintings and prints, the study of drapery is an ongoing process. Studying the catenary loop and using the equation takes me a step closer to understanding the form of drapery. The painting is a mathematical graph showing y =f(x). Although this painting is an experiment with a simple equation to understand the behavior of fabric, it is still foremost a painting: a work that is both formally correct and visually compelling.

This work was created in response to presentations and informal discussions with Physicist Costas Efthimiou and undergraduate researcher Christopher Frye in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's intermediate painting class, Fall 2010.

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Uncertainty - Patience Welch

Led to learn more about quantum mechanics, I took inspiration from Hugh Everett's work concerning the many worlds interpretation. The painting explores the enigmatic nature of an unobserved life, just as an electron or particle could theoretically exist in multiple places before it is measured.

This work was created in response to presentations and informal discussions with Physicist Costas Efthimiou and undergraduate researcher Christopher Frye in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's intermediate painting class, Fall 2010.

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Untitled - Nancy Fuentes

In these three paintings, I created a sequential series of images representing the concept of Quantum Foam in a new way by suggesting the illusion of a progression in spacetime. The circular shapes in these paintings are not intended to illustrate foam or a froth-like substance; instead they are intended to represent symbolic substitutions of the particles that make up quantum foam as a subatomic disturbance. As turbulence and agitation increases, the representations of the shapes evolve until they reach their last stage of turmoil.

This work was created in response to presentations and informal discussions with Physicist Costas Efthimiou and undergraduate researcher Christopher Frye in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's intermediate painting class, Fall 2010.

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A Less Certain Existence - Jasibe Cure-Twede

Presenting a conundrum, this painting reflects the innate need to investigate. The form is a metaphorical image referring to the ultimate mystery of our being in the world. There is something to be known, yet remains unknowable. Suspended from an unseen limit, the form's interaction with the figure leads to a hypothesis, but without any assumption of its definitive truth.

This work was created in response to presentations and informal discussions with Physicist Costas Efthimiou and undergraduate researcher Christopher Frye in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's advanced painting class, Spring 2011.

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Sea Urchins - Alea de Bengson

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Danna Bachand

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Untitled - Emily Daniels

Getting inspiration from the Theory of Relativity where light is the protagonist and observers in different motions record it differently, I decided to paint a scene in which a `fast’ moving driver observes the environment to demonstrate that, although relativistic effects are not noticeable with our speeds, the limited human perception is affected by `fast’ speeds when recording light.

This work was created in response to presentations and informal discussions with Physicist Costas Efthimiou and undergraduate researcher Christopher Frye in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class, Spring 2011.

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Andy Riding Yoshi - Masami Koshikawa

In all my recent work, I have been exploring my son, Andrew Taiga Ghiloni, as the subject matter. He was born on September 10 2010, while I was a full-time student at the University of Central Florida. The paintings during this period reflect my struggle as a young artist and a mother. For example, “Cow in Camouflage” expresses the hardship of motherhood. “Andy Riding Yoshi” suggests how simulation games can be an educational material for children. But sometimes I wonder if the technology is advancing too quickly. Is our humanity threatened in our modern society? I hope that if we use our science and our knowledge of games wisely, trillions of people’s lives and our environment may be saved which will allow us transcend to the next generations.

This work was created in response to a presentation and informal discussions by Computer Scientist Dan Mapes and ICubed fellow, Peter Tonner in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class in Spring 2011.

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Andy the Painter - Masami Koshikawa

The style of my paintings often combine both realistic and abstract approaches that are revealed in multiple layers of imagery that reflects my true identity as I exist in Japanese, Chinese, and American heritages. The believable objects help viewers to connect with the meaning behind the painting. We are not clear how things are sometimes connected in our world, because there is a looming ambiguity. I try to express this ambiguity through abstraction to invite the viewers to enjoy the juxtaposition between our physical world and imagination. Pixels appear on a background, which can sometimes appear on a foreground suggest our modern world of art.

This work was created in response to a presentation and informal discussions by Computer Scientist Dan Mapes and ICubed fellow, Peter Tonner in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class in Spring 2011.

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