iCubed

Fall 2012 STEAM Paintings

One of the objectives of ICubed is to inform the UCF Community about scientific concepts. The project is meeting this objective by funding the STEAM Gallery Initiative which is an activity that encourages STEM researchers to expand their thinking and find ways to communicate their science to non-STEM audiences.

In Fall 2012, the ICubed team relied on previous experiences to create artwork for the gallery. Through STEAM, UCF STEM faculty researchers who received grant supplements for their students, interacted with faculty and students in the School of Visual Arts and Design (SVAD). Participating Art and Design students attended a 3-week long seminar, as part of their course of study, and created science-inspired art based on the STEM researcher's explanations of science concepts and possibilities. In this ICubed Initiative, Visual Arts students were able to find new creative ways to communicate the science through their art.

A number of artwork created during these seminars was preserved for the STEAM Gallery, a travelling exhibition displaying science inspired art. During the Fall 2012 semester, ICubed invited two STEM researchers to present their work in Carla Poindexter's Advanced Painting class. The first presenting group was Dr. Costas Efthimiou and his ICubed Fellow Christopher Frye from the Physics Department. They discussed physics-inspired paintings and also explained the theory of everything as well as the theory of relativity. They expanded on these works to help students see where the real science stops and where the creativity starts. They then presented information on quantum foam and the intricacies of our universe, including time and space, and asked the students to create works inspired from these ideas. The second presenting group was Dr. Stephen Kuebler and his ICubed Fellow Gabriel Padilla from the College of Chemistry & Optics. They presented research and information about nanotechnology and explained that science and art go hand-in-hand. They discussed aspects of nano science. Dr. Kuebler used visual illusions to teach concepts. Both presentations ended with a question and answer session and the opportunity for the students to become inspired by these research ideas that could lead to the creation of their artwork.

NSF

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No.0963146. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

UCF

Untitled - Anna Cruz

Parallel Play: a form of play among a group of children, primarily toddlers, in which each engages in an independent activity that is similar to but not influenced by or shared with the others.

I want to address the difficulty to communicate between the fields of art and science. I think that both share the same goal of understanding the most basic questions of existence and of attempting to answer these questions with human perception and investigation. We are, however, hindered by the vast difference in the language, approach, and understanding between the two fields. In making this painting, I was thinking about this strange and lonely coexistence.

This work was inspired by and created in response to both presentations by Stephen M. Kuebler, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Optics, on his research in Nanophotonic Materials and in response to a presentation by Physicist Costas Efthimiou on 'Science vs. Pseudoscience' and informal discussions with undergraduate science student researchers Christopher Frye and Gabriel Padilla, in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's advanced painting class, Fall 2012.

×

Absolved of Reason - Boris Ugartecha

'And I looked, and behold a pale horse: and his name that sat on it was Faith, and Folly followed with him.'

This work was inspired by and created in response to both presentations by Stephen M. Kuebler, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Optics, on his research in Nanophotonic Materials and in response to a presentation by Physicist Costas Efthimiou on 'Science vs. Pseudoscience' and informal discussions with undergraduate science student researchers Christopher Frye and Gabriel Padilla, in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's advanced painting class, Fall 2012.

×

Dust to Dust - Brynne Heatley

The atoms that make us are as old as the Universe itself. We're just borrowing collections of dust. In the end, we have to give it all back.

This work was inspired by and created in response to both presentations by Stephen M. Kuebler, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Optics, on his research in Nanophotonic Materials and in response to a presentation by Physicist Costas Efthimiou on 'Science vs. Pseudoscience' and informal discussions with undergraduate science student researchers Christopher Frye and Gabriel Padilla, in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's advanced painting class, Fall 2012.

×

The New Era - Camilo Cuervo

Science and Art are related in more ways than we know. To be able to copy an image of what we see or to make a replication of what we know is something mankind has strived for centuries to achieve. Answering questions only reveals more questions. Mankind and nature once bonded. Now we are more at odds with it. Through radical advancement in technology, we now strive to make 'Nature'. The New Era of a digital machine world is growing. What will become of us, of nature and of the future?

This work was inspired by and created in response to both presentations by Stephen M. Kuebler, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Optics, on his research in Nanophotonic Materials and in response to a presentation by Physicist Costas Efthimiou on 'Science vs. Pseudoscience' and informal discussions with undergraduate science student researchers Christopher Frye and Gabriel Padilla, in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's advanced painting class, Fall 2012.

×

Confectionary Coatings (TiO2, SiO2) - Christie Gonzalez

Gumball machines bring thoughts of childhood, a garish carousel of colors that calls to our need for instant gratification. Gum balls are another creation in a long lineage of abundance that acts like a therapy, a calming statement that society will provide all and more than one needs, as long as we don't look too closely at the ingredients, which are often supplemented with nano-scale minerals such as silicon, magnesium, calcium, and zeolite, but also nanosilver and nanogold. The tolerable daily intake of these materials is not known.

This work was inspired by and created in response to both presentations by Stephen M. Kuebler, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Optics, on his research in Nanophotonic Materials and in response to a presentation by Physicist Costas Efthimiou on 'Science vs. Pseudoscience' and informal discussions with undergraduate science student researchers Christopher Frye and Gabriel Padilla, in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's advanced painting class, Fall 2012.

×

Polymer-scape - Desiree Lu

I was inspired by Professor Stephen Kuebler's presentation about polymers to create a polymer-scape that can be even more beautiful than a naturally painted landscape. I applied tiny bits of plastic from plastic water bottles and pieces of artificial corks from wine bottles to the surface of my painting. The merger of paint and polymer creates iridescence that teases out the beauty of light.

This work was inspired by and created in response to both presentations by Stephen M. Kuebler, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Optics, on his research in Nanophotonic Materials and in response to a presentation by Physicist Costas Efthimiou on 'Science vs. Pseudoscience' and informal discussions with undergraduate science student researchers Christopher Frye and Gabriel Padilla, in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's advanced painting class, Fall 2012.

×

The Polymer Hands - Jennifer Lanna

My work explores both the idea of nanotechnology and the relationship between science and art. I feel the relationship exists due to a similar motive of fabricating and/or emulating the natural world and its processes. This relationship is shown with both medium and images.

This work was inspired by and created in response to both presentations by Stephen M. Kuebler, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Optics, on his research in Nanophotonic Materials and in response to a presentation by Physicist Costas Efthimiou on 'Science vs. Pseudoscience' and informal discussions with undergraduate science student researchers Christopher Frye and Gabriel Padilla, in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's advanced painting class, Fall 2012.

×

Homage to Nature's Design - Jordan Guzman

In this painting I am responding to the patterns and geometry in nature. The golden ratio seen in the nautilus shell has historically been used in creating aesthetically pleasing proportions in art and design. I wanted to showcase this ancient concept in a contemporary way through the layering of paint and suggestion of geometry.

This work was inspired by and created in response to both presentations by Stephen M. Kuebler, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Optics, on his research in Nanophotonic Materials and in response to a presentation by Physicist Costas Efthimiou on 'Science vs. Pseudoscience' and informal discussions with undergraduate science student researchers Christopher Frye and Gabriel Padilla, in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's advanced painting class, Fall 2012.

×

With Knowledge Man May Judge Himself - Laura Mills

The sentence is from a Phrenology diagram over a hundred years old. The innate vagueness of the statement made me think about what we know presently of the world around us and what we could possibly find out in the future. This painting personifies the connection and battle between these ideas; the idea of what we had regarded as truth and the progress to search for new truth.

This work was created in response to a presentation by Physicist Costas Efthimiou on 'Science vs. Pseudoscience' and informal discussions with undergraduate researcher Christopher Frye in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's advanced painting class, Fall 2012.

×

Common Ground - Lauren Stanton

Scientists and artists are typically viewed as polar opposites. Yet both isolate themselves physically and/or mentally to come up with creative ideas. Within this place or isolation, they gather and organize thoughts. Abstract ideas may be strung together to create a more solid vision. The intellectual journey begins here.

This work was inspired by and created in response to both presentations by Stephen M. Kuebler, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Optics, on his research in Nanophotonic Materials and in response to a presentation by Physicist Costas Efthimiou on 'Science vs. Pseudoscience' and informal discussions with undergraduate science student researchers Christopher Frye and Gabriel Padilla, in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's advanced painting class, Fall 2012.

×

Untitled - Lujan Perez-Hernandez

This work deals with the dichotomy between birth and decay.

This work was created in response to a presentation by Physicist Costas Efthimiou on 'Science vs. Pseudoscience' and informal discussions with undergraduate researcher Christopher Frye in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's advanced painting class, Fall 2012.

×

Measurements - Max Binderow

My work explores the broad scientific principles of observing and understanding. In response to the presentation on pseudoscience, I questioned why so many individuals are willing to put faith into unsubstantiated theories. I discovered that we seek pseudoscientific answers in the same way we seek scientific, religious and spiritual answers for the questions we have. They are all different solutions to a common problem: our fear of the unknown. It is that fear which drives us to create structured systems by which we can better explain the perplexities of existence, and in doing so we often lose sight of our humanity. It is important to separate oneself from the desire for understanding; all that we know is that we know nothing.

This work was created in response to a presentation by Physicist Costas Efthimiou on 'Science vs. Pseudoscience' and informal discussions with undergraduate researcher Christopher Frye in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's advanced painting class, Fall 2012.

×

Natalia Diaz

×

And Pride Cometh before the Fall - Paul Finch

This painting is a visual poem in response to my belief that science is not as important as society thinks it is. (Despite my own interest in it.) More and more, physics tells us that the universe is fundamentally different than we experience it, which makes me anxious at times. Why do we get so caught up in the desire to learn about things our senses cannot truly experience?

This painting was inspired by discussions with and presentations by all of the STEAM participants in Spring and Fall 2011.

×

Corpus - Paul Finch

In order to learn, we must align new unknown information with what we already know. Because knowledge is imperfect, correct and incorrect new information can be seamlessly encoded into our structure of knowledge. At all times we must directly investigate the ways in which our own abilities to perceive, perform, record, and communicate are lacking. Like a fever, this process can be uncomfortable at times.

This work was inspired by and created in response to both presentations by Stephen M. Kuebler, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Optics, on his research in Nanophotonic Materials and in response to a presentation by Physicist Costas Efthimiou on 'Science vs. Pseudoscience' and informal discussions with undergraduate science student researchers Christopher Frye and Gabriel Padilla, in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's advanced painting class, Fall 2012.

×

Pyramidal Neuron Landscape - Pierina Nunez

Everyone knows that nature is beautiful. So much of nature's beauty, however, is too small to see without a microscope. Pyramidal neurons are structures that integrate and transmit information in the brain. There are fundamental similarities in the geometric structures of neurons, tree branches, roots and how they grow. The elegant forms of neurons take the path of least resistance, just as trees, veins, and lightning. These branch-like structures create spontaneous twists and turns, to grow in the easiest direction. Neurons prove that the same beauty seen in traditional forms, such as trees, can also be seen at the molecular level.

This work was inspired by and created in response to both presentations by Stephen M. Kuebler, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Optics, on his research in Nanophotonic Materials and in response to a presentation by Physicist Costas Efthimiou on 'Science vs. Pseudoscience' and informal discussions with undergraduate science student researchers Christopher Frye and Gabriel Padilla, in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's advanced painting class, Fall 2012.

×

The Concept of Existing - Steven Kallas

Wherever you go, there you are.

One of the most difficult things to comprehend is how we humans, come to understand impossible concepts like the universe. It's almost as if we are wired to believe certain things without explanation.

This work was created in response to a presentation by Physicist Costas Efthimiou on 'Science vs. Pseudoscience' and informal discussions with undergraduate researcher Christopher Frye in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's advanced painting class, Fall 2012.

×