iCubed

Spring 2012 STEAM Paintings

One of the objectives of ICubed is to inform the UCF Community about scientific concepts. The project is meeting this objective by funding the STEAM Gallery Initiative which is an activity that encourages STEM researchers to expand their thinking and find ways to communicate their science to non-STEM audiences.

In Spring 2012, the ICubed team relied on previous experiences to create artwork for the gallery. Through STEAM, UCF STEM faculty researchers who received grant supplements for their students, interacted with faculty and students in the School of Visual Arts and Design (SVAD). Participating Art and Design students attended a 3-week long seminar, as part of their course of study, and created science-inspired art based on the STEM researcher's explanations of science concepts and possibilities. In this ICubed Initiative, Visual Arts students were able to find new creative ways to communicate the science through their art.

A number of artwork created during these seminars was preserved for the STEAM Gallery, a travelling exhibition displaying science inspired art. During the Spring 2012 semester, ICubed invited two STEM researchers to present their work in Carla Poindexter's Advanced Painting class. The first presenting group was Dr. Costas Efthimiou and his ICubed Fellow Christopher Frye from the Physics Department. They discussed physics-inspired paintings and also explained the theory of everything as well as the theory of relativity. They expanded on these works to help students see where the real science stops and where the creativity starts. They then presented information on quantum foam and the intricacies of our universe, including time and space, and asked the students to create works inspired from these ideas. The second presenting group was Dr. Kiminobu Sugaya and his ICubed Fellow Mario Pita from the Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences. They presented research and information about neuroscience and the brain and explained that science and art go hand-in-hand. They discussed aspects of stem cell research and the function and purpose of brain cells. Dr. Sugaya used visual illusions to teach concepts and to show the class how the brain functions. They continued by discussing different laws of forms and perceptions that our brains use in order to see and make sense of our world. Both presentations ended with a question and answer session and the opportunity for the students to become inspired by these research ideas that could lead to the creation of their artwork.

NSF

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No.0963146. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

UCF

Coma - Slawek Kozub

People generally think that the natural world is separate from them and that they don't belong in it. Some have exaggerated preconceived ideas about it, often fueled by the media's incorrect portrayal of science. This painting represents some of those fears, those which are based on ignorance and surface when a phobia dominates or inhibits our approach to science. I hope this piece will turn fear into curiosity and inspire people to experience nature for themselves.

This work was created in response to a presentation by Physicist Costas Efthimiou in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's advanced painting class

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Order in Chaos - Sarah Rozman

In this painting, I created a 'negative' space filled with birds of all breeds, flying about the canvas in a disorderly, yet orderly way. I attempted to create a sense of chaos, and I incorporated birds because of their natural built-in sonar systems. Birds almost never collide with each other, despite their quick speeds and sudden changes in movement. Birds in flight sense one another's closeness (by eyesight) and read the signals as a form of touch. Birds read their personal 'sonar' and thus, avoid colliding with one another.

This work was created in response to presentations by Physicist Costas Efthimiou and Neuroscientist Kiminoba Sugaya in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's advanced painting class

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Untitled - Carlos M. Sosa Jr.

In making my paintings for the STEAM project, I was inspired by our heroic search for the reason behind our existence. Considering Dr. Costas's research and presentations, I am reminded of how naked and ignorant humanity is of the universe and how dangerous and unknown it is to us. We tug at the fabric of time and space searching for a lasso to unify everything, to find what makes the world work. There is a possibility that the search for this understanding is probably just beyond our comprehension, that we, as a species, do not have the tools to understand what it is we are looking at.

This work was created in response to a presentation by Physicist Costas Efthimiou in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's advanced painting class, Spring 2012.

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Inner Space - Pierina Nunez

'We don't know what matter is anymore than we know what mind is.' - Christian de Quincy, The Paradox of Consciousness I was inspired by the idea that everything we know of the world around us is no more than our self-perception. Our own thinking, our own inner processes, and our own minds determine our experiences. All we know about who we are develops in our inner space, our minds.

This work was created in response to a presentation by Neuroscientist Kiminoba Sugaya in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's advanced painting class, Spring 2012.

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Untitled - Emily Southall

Using two landscapes in a diptych I am representing the left and right hemispheres of the brain. The trees represent brain cells (neurons) and how they communicate with each other. The reflection of the two panels represent 'mirror neurons' which are brain cells that fire when an animal (including human) observes the behavior of another, i.e. 'monkey see monkey do.' Brain cell communication is implicated in many neurological disorders including developmental/autism spectrum disorders, anxiety, depression, bi-polar, and schizophrenia. I thus address the importance of mental health expressed through art, as well as the importance of the community's impact on the individual's neurological development.

This work was created in response to presentations by Neuroscientist Kiminoba Sugaya in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's advanced painting class, Spring 2012.

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Untitled - Carlos M. Sosa Jr.

It is like we are ants living on the side of a great highway, believing that this civilization is so great and that we have accomplished so much. There might be entities out there, which have done much more, entities that have built a massive highway that we cannot yet comprehend. Entities we cannot yet perceive but who can crush humanity like ants.

This work was created in response to a presentation by Physicist Costas Efthimiou in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's advanced painting class, Spring 2012.

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Uncertain - Andrea Velasco

Emptiness becomes something once we become aware of its existence. Physics attempts and intends someday to give answers to all questions. Yet the precision of the final answer is limited by the Uncertainty Principle of Quantum Mechanics: 'If you know where you are, you don't know where you are going. If you know where you are going, you don't know where you are.' The ambiguity of space and form between the layers of canvas, paint and materials in my painting is intended to encourage a viewer to explore their own perceptions and experiences in order to find a relationship with the work and metaphor. This painting attempts to illustrate the opposite intention of physics: To celebrate the ambiguous and poetic; the grey in-between, rather than seeking the answers to everything.

This work was created in response to presentations by Physicist Costas Efthimiou and Neuroscientist Kiminoba Sugaya in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's advanced painting class, Spring 2012.

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The Wall - Jahida Ramos

I was inspired by an example given by Professor Costas when he was presenting Quantum Physics: that of the tunneling effect. Even the slightest possibility of something 'other worldly' happening in our reality excites my imagination. However, I went with a more humorous approach to the topic. For me, the best part of going through a wall is a person's reaction when they realize what happened.

This work was created in response to a presentation by Physicist Costas Efthimiou in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter's advanced painting class, Spring 2012.

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Ashley Lipman

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Christian Yehudah

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Emily Daniels

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Emily Daniels

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Emily Daniels

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Emilie Finney

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Emily Southall

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Penrose Stairway - Alex Fox

This painting was inspired by a physical phenomenon called the Penrose steps which is essentially a never ending staircase. This painting is a representation of our limited human intellectual capacity and our compulsive need to keep trying and trying when our actions yield the same result.

This work was created in response to presentations and informal discussions with Physicist Costas Efthimiou and undergraduate researcher Christopher Frye in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class, Fall 2011.

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Jose Gladys

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Jordan Guzman

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Mark Leary

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Natalie Angelos

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Paul Finch

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Untitled - Seth Czaplewski

This painting is about the “Theory of Everything”. When I first heard about the theory it sounded “out there” and still does. My painting makes as much sense as the theory of everything. It has very loose connections and it’s out there.

This work was created in response to presentations and informal discussions with Physicist Costas Efthimiou and undergraduate researcher Christopher Frye in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class, Spring 2011.

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