iCubed

Spring 2013 STEAM Paintings

One of the objectives of ICubed is to inform the UCF Community about scientific concepts. The project is meeting this objective by funding the STEAM Gallery Initiative which is an activity that encourages STEM researchers to expand their thinking and find ways to communicate their science to non-STEM audiences. In order to best communicate STEM research conducted at UCF, ICubed created teams of two, composed of a student from a STEM discipline and a student from the School of Visual Arts and Design (SVAD). Over the spring 2013 semester, the student teams worked together to produce a poster that was visually appealing and understandable to the lay person. This is the first semester where the painting and STEM students were selected in an independent study class led by Carla Poindexter and Dr. Costas Efthimiou.

NSF

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No.0963146. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

UCF

All Living Things Are Made of Carbon - Omalix Martinez

“Study the science of art. Study the art of science. Develop your senses-learn how to see. Realize that everything connects to everything else.” Leonardo Da Vinci.

Graphene is a material that directly derives from carbon, just like graphite and charcoal do. Since carbon is found in all organic things, I was inspired to do a series of abstract paintings based on close-up and even microscopic views of different things from nature. Each one of the paintings is also related to the concept of conductivity. I think it becomes really important not to reveal what each one of them exactly represents and allow the viewer to experience my paintings as something that goes beyond the mere representation of an object. Repetition and the rendering of light are key elements within my series as well as the selection of a monochromatic palette. To me, it was absolutely necessary to paint them that way since the human eye can perceive carbon compounds as shades of gray to black.

This work was inspired by and created in response to informal discussions with undergraduate research assistant Evelyn Strunk on her research with neural networks and the electrical conductivity of grapheme in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter’s and Professor Dr. Costas Efthimiou’s Independent Study course, Spring 2013.

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All Living Things Are Made of Carbon - Omalix Martinez

“Study the science of art. Study the art of science. Develop your senses-learn how to see. Realize that everything connects to everything else.” Leonardo Da Vinci.

Graphene is a material that directly derives from carbon, just like graphite and charcoal do. Since carbon is found in all organic things, I was inspired to do a series of abstract paintings based on close-up and even microscopic views of different things from nature. Each one of the paintings is also related to the concept of conductivity. I think it becomes really important not to reveal what each one of them exactly represents and allow the viewer to experience my paintings as something that goes beyond the mere representation of an object. Repetition and the rendering of light are key elements within my series as well as the selection of a monochromatic palette. To me, it was absolutely necessary to paint them that way since the human eye can perceive carbon compounds as shades of gray to black.

This work was inspired by and created in response to informal discussions with undergraduate research assistant Evelyn Strunk on her research with neural networks and the electrical conductivity of grapheme in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter’s and Professor Dr. Costas Efthimiou’s Independent Study course, Spring 2013.

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All Living Things Are Made of Carbon - Omalix Martinez

“Study the science of art. Study the art of science. Develop your senses-learn how to see. Realize that everything connects to everything else.” Leonardo Da Vinci.

Graphene is a material that directly derives from carbon, just like graphite and charcoal do. Since carbon is found in all organic things, I was inspired to do a series of abstract paintings based on close-up and even microscopic views of different things from nature. Each one of the paintings is also related to the concept of conductivity. I think it becomes really important not to reveal what each one of them exactly represents and allow the viewer to experience my paintings as something that goes beyond the mere representation of an object. Repetition and the rendering of light are key elements within my series as well as the selection of a monochromatic palette. To me, it was absolutely necessary to paint them that way since the human eye can perceive carbon compounds as shades of gray to black.

This work was inspired by and created in response to informal discussions with undergraduate research assistant Evelyn Strunk on her research with neural networks and the electrical conductivity of grapheme in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter’s and Professor Dr. Costas Efthimiou’s Independent Study course, Spring 2013.

×

All Living Things Are Made of Carbon - Omalix Martinez

“Study the science of art. Study the art of science. Develop your senses-learn how to see. Realize that everything connects to everything else.” Leonardo Da Vinci.

Graphene is a material that directly derives from carbon, just like graphite and charcoal do. Since carbon is found in all organic things, I was inspired to do a series of abstract paintings based on close-up and even microscopic views of different things from nature. Each one of the paintings is also related to the concept of conductivity. I think it becomes really important not to reveal what each one of them exactly represents and allow the viewer to experience my paintings as something that goes beyond the mere representation of an object. Repetition and the rendering of light are key elements within my series as well as the selection of a monochromatic palette. To me, it was absolutely necessary to paint them that way since the human eye can perceive carbon compounds as shades of gray to black.

This work was inspired by and created in response to informal discussions with undergraduate research assistant Evelyn Strunk on her research with neural networks and the electrical conductivity of grapheme in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter’s and Professor Dr. Costas Efthimiou’s Independent Study course, Spring 2013.

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All Living Things Are Made of Carbon - Omalix Martinez

“Study the science of art. Study the art of science. Develop your senses-learn how to see. Realize that everything connects to everything else.” Leonardo Da Vinci.

Graphene is a material that directly derives from carbon, just like graphite and charcoal do. Since carbon is found in all organic things, I was inspired to do a series of abstract paintings based on close-up and even microscopic views of different things from nature. Each one of the paintings is also related to the concept of conductivity. I think it becomes really important not to reveal what each one of them exactly represents and allow the viewer to experience my paintings as something that goes beyond the mere representation of an object. Repetition and the rendering of light are key elements within my series as well as the selection of a monochromatic palette. To me, it was absolutely necessary to paint them that way since the human eye can perceive carbon compounds as shades of gray to black.

This work was inspired by and created in response to informal discussions with undergraduate research assistant Evelyn Strunk on her research with neural networks and the electrical conductivity of grapheme in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter’s and Professor Dr. Costas Efthimiou’s Independent Study course, Spring 2013.

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Untitled - Steven Kallas

These paintings are inspired by the research and treatment of a hypothetical person who has been diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type 2, a disease that can lead to hearing loss. When someone loses one of their senses it is said that their other senses become stronger. Even so, I imagine life to be very dull without sound.

The world is listening
It's all just noise to me
I'm afraid If only I could remember
The sounds
Would I listen too If I could

This series resulted from a STEAM Independent Study collaboration between UCF advanced painting student Steven Kallas and STEM student Matt Donnan who is currently researching Neurofibromatosis type 2. This collaboration was supervised by Carla Poindexter, Associate Professor of Art and Physicist, Dr. Costas Efthimiou.

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Untitled - Steven Kallas

These paintings are inspired by the research and treatment of a hypothetical person who has been diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type 2, a disease that can lead to hearing loss. When someone loses one of their senses it is said that their other senses become stronger. Even so, I imagine life to be very dull without sound.

The world is listening
It's all just noise to me
I'm afraid If only I could remember
The sounds
Would I listen too If I could

This series resulted from a STEAM Independent Study collaboration between UCF advanced painting student Steven Kallas and STEM student Matt Donnan who is currently researching Neurofibromatosis type 2. This collaboration was supervised by Carla Poindexter, Associate Professor of Art and Physicist, Dr. Costas Efthimiou.

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Untitled - Steven Kallas

These paintings are inspired by the research and treatment of a hypothetical person who has been diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type 2, a disease that can lead to hearing loss. When someone loses one of their senses it is said that their other senses become stronger. Even so, I imagine life to be very dull without sound.

The world is listening
It's all just noise to me
I'm afraid If only I could remember
The sounds
Would I listen too If I could

This series resulted from a STEAM Independent Study collaboration between UCF advanced painting student Steven Kallas and STEM student Matt Donnan who is currently researching Neurofibromatosis type 2. This collaboration was supervised by Carla Poindexter, Associate Professor of Art and Physicist, Dr. Costas Efthimiou.

×

Untitled - Steven Kallas

These paintings are inspired by the research and treatment of a hypothetical person who has been diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type 2, a disease that can lead to hearing loss. When someone loses one of their senses it is said that their other senses become stronger. Even so, I imagine life to be very dull without sound.

The world is listening
It's all just noise to me
I'm afraid If only I could remember
The sounds
Would I listen too If I could

This series resulted from a STEAM Independent Study collaboration between UCF advanced painting student Steven Kallas and STEM student Matt Donnan who is currently researching Neurofibromatosis type 2. This collaboration was supervised by Carla Poindexter, Associate Professor of Art and Physicist, Dr. Costas Efthimiou.

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Levitation - Omalix Martinez

With this painting, I explored the concept of weightlessness as well as the mysteries of the paranormal. It is up to the viewer’s interpretation if this woman is simply in a dream-like state or if something beyond her control is holding her up.

This work was created in response to a presentation by Physicist Dr. Costas Efthimiou on “Science vs. Pseudoscience” under the supervision of Associate Professor Carla Poindexter.

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Untitled - Lujan Perez Hernadez

After several weeks of struggling to find a subject or idea with my STEM partner, I was finally invited to the Physics building to witness an experiment within Christopher Tiller’s field of research first hand. What captured my attention the most was the idea that there was a great deal of trial and error required in attempting to retrieve workable data. With this in mind, I wanted to recreate, instead of illustrate, the process of the experiment through different materials. The quantity of paintings directly correlates with the idea that a lot of things can and will go wrong in the experiment.

Some of these paintings suggest the traces of impact in Tiller’s research successfully while others may not. However, by exhibiting a large grouping of these painting investigations in the form of a grid, I am offering viewers an opportunity to contemplate images that may appear at first to be purely abstract but are not.

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Untitled (Inspired by the work of Aubrey De Grey on ending aging) - Jeff Piettinck

“The primary function of art is not to imitate or represent or interpret, but to create a living thing; it is the reduction of all life to a perfectly composed and dynamic miniature – a microcosm where there is perfect balance of emotion and intellect, stress and strain resolving itself and form rhythmically poised into three dimensions.”

Aubrey De Grey is science researcher involved in the study of the social, psychological and biological aspects of aging; also known as gerontology. His research seeks to prevent and reverse age-related ill health by applying regenerative medicine to repair damage of aging at the level where it occurs. He is seeking to discover new regenerative therapies to remove, repair, replace or render harmless the cellular and molecular damage that accumulates with time. By reconstructing the structured order of the living machinery of our tissues, these rejuvenation biotechnologies will restore the normal functioning of the body's cells and essential biomolecules, returning aging tissues to health and bringing back the body’s youthful vigor. Even after we have used these new therapies to repair an aging tissue, metabolic processes will continue to cause new damage. This simply means that rejuvenation biotechnologies are not a one-time fix, but will need to be periodically repeated to preserve youthful function. Just as cars need regular rounds of oil changes and spark plug replacements to keep them running smoothly, people will need to go in to rejuvenation clinics to keep up with their regenerative treatments to continue postponing age-related disease.

This painting was created as an independently researched topic under the supervision of Associate Professor of Art Carla Poindexter for the STEAM project.

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Untitled - Jeff Piettinck

This painting depicts the frustration that arises through miscommunication and misunderstanding. In order for a collaboration between the arts and sciences to work, there must be a great deal of communication that paves the way for a successful outcome. Many failed attempts at compromise led to an ultimate collapse in creating a piece that was directly inspired by the science and so I attempted to illustrate collaborative frustration.

This painting was created in response to the collaborative Independent Study STEAM project under the supervision of Associate Professor of Art Carla Poindexter.

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Places We Occupy Become Echoes That Haunt The Mind - Chris Ware

Symbolically the kitchen is the center of the home. It is a place where our nutritional needs are met. A place where we sit and talk of memories long gone and where new ones are made. These ghosts that roam the corridors of our minds, they make us who we are. For without them we would be nothing more than a blank canvas.

This work was created in response to a presentation by Neuroscientist, Dr. Kiminoba Sugaya in Associate Professor Carla Poindexter’s Advanced painting class, Spring 2012.

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Untitled - Anna Cruz

“The decisions that we make, individually and collectively, will determine whether the outcomes of 21st century sciences are benign or devastating.”

-Sir Martin Rees

This self-portrait is a response to Sir Martin Rees’s TED talk about our responsibility to stay wary of quickly accelerating technological advances, which may cause severe consequences both to the environment and our health.

This painting was inspired by physics presentations and discussions amongst science and art students. This is Cruz’s third painting contribution to the STEAM Initiative. She is a BFA student specializing in Painting with minors in Drawing and Printmaking.

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Picking Fruit - Max Binderow

In response to the STEAM presentation on Science Versus Pseudoscience by Costas in Fall 2012, I began to explore why individuals turned to fanciful and unfounded answers to life’s hardest questions. I found that some people seek pseudoscientific solutions in the same way others seek religious, spiritual and even scientific explanations for the natural world. It is a means of understanding and attaining some sort of completeness in our lives; a reflection of our ambivalence toward the unknown. My work explores how we sometimes lose sight of ourselves when pursuing these answers, and how damaging this can be to our personal lives.

This work was created in response to a presentation by Physicist Dr. Costas Efthimiou on “Science vs. Pseudoscience” under the supervision of Associate Professor Carla Poindexter.

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Musings from an Alternative Narrator - Alesha Hassard

Like a film over the eye, I perceived a new layer. Whether I was beholding the infinitesimally small, the inexpressively massive, or an equivalent alternative it did not matter; the key was, I could see! - The Narrator

Musings is the continuing narrative based on my previous STEAM related work, Where the Wall was Thinnest (2012) and At the Edge of Perception (2012). In this new narrative, The Narrator, an alternative version to the one from Wall, is able to peer into realms hitherto inaccessible. In imparting this narrative to the viewer, interactive distancing becomes a tool of exploration. From a distance, the painting appears universal in its material. Upon closer inspection, the difference in materials and new pockets of detail reveal themselves. Much like our scientists, uncovering knowledge and truth, this painting seeks to metaphorically relate to their endeavors.

This painting was inspired by physics presentations and individual research. This is Hassard’s forth painting contribution to the STEAM Initiative. She is a BFA student specializing in Creative Writing and Book Arts with a Painting minor.

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You Picked Me - Mary Joy Torrecampo

Inspired by my collaboration with Christopher Frye, this diptych shows the observer effect in quantum mechanics and the possibility of which path electrons take before they are observed. In the absence of an observer, the multiple individuals on the larger canvas can be in many places simultaneously. Once observed, the electron’s path changes with the most probable path being a straight line. The dark, obscure background represents the unknown, a world that is void of human observation. The diagonal with the more pronounced figures is the most probable path. As figures are spread outwards from that path, they become less distinguishable as the probability of the electron observed taking that path decreases. The smaller canvas represents the world that humans inhabit and the darkness fades with only one individual waving to the observer on the left as if aware that it is being observed.

Mary Joy Torrecampo is currently a BFA painting major mainly interested in portraiture and figurative painting.

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