iCubed

Fall 2014 STEAM Paintings

NSF

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No.0963146. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

UCF

Unvei - Shanna_Stiles

This painting confronts the dichotomy between the illusions and realities of the cyber world. By merging light, energy, and elemental nature with a distinct architectural space, I seek to reconcile an understanding of the Internet. It is not merely a weightless invisible cloud, but a distinct material center where our data is stored. Thus, this temporal illusion of light and form is depicted through many layers of paint and abstracted with geometric structures.

This work was inspired by research presentations on the topic, “Cyber security” by Dr. Yier Jin, UCF Professor and undergraduate STEM student Grant Hernandez, in Professor Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class.

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Immunity - Jordan Senarens

After hearing the STEM presentation on Internet Security, I immediately considered the idea of representing a computer with the human brain. Like a computer, the brain works by sending signals that are interpreted by the receiving cell. When something goes wrong during this process, there can be disastrous effects. This is when computers can be attacked by viruses, which lowers their security and allows hackers access to the computer’s information. My painting demonstrates Multiple Sclerosis, an autoimmune disease caused by the host’s t-cells, a type of white blood cell, attacking the brain’s neurons and damaging the synapse process. This in turn lowers the immune system and can leave the infected person vulnerable to other diseases.

This work was inspired by research presentations on the topic, “Cyber security” by Dr. Yier Jin, UCF Professor and undergraduate STEM student Grant Hernandez, in Professor Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class.

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“The Cloud”, Quincy, Washington - Sylwia Ponicki

My painting was inspired by the amount of smart devices and intelligent machines we use every day combined with the high number of data centers required to maintain our current state. There is an overwhelming amount of energy needed to operate the data centers and a high frequency with which the coding system needs to be changed in order to store all of the data. This painting illustrates Quincy, Washington data centers such as Yahoo, Intuit, Sandy, Dell, Microsoft and the childish myth of “The Cloud” inspired by the Timo Arnall film titled, “Internet Machine.” It’s a multi-screen film about the invisible infrastructure of the Internet. The film reveals the hidden materiality of our data by exploring some of the machines through which ‘the cloud’ is transmitted and transformed. The colors and mood of the painting are inspired by smart icons, or “emojis” that we see beautifully displayed in our phones, like delicious cookies and sweets. They are tempting and inviting, yet they represent the dangerous side of dependency and enslavement. If the user forgets about this dark side of the Internet, the user becomes exposed to its dangers.

This work was inspired by research presentations on the topic, “Cyber security” by Dr. Yier Jin, UCF Professor and undergraduate STEM student Grant Hernandez, in Professor Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class.

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Your Wires Are Showing - Lindsay Green

In 2011, the AeroVironment Nano Hummingbird was displayed by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). These little drones have the ability to perform surveillance for both indoor and outdoor use. While they can be used in the battlefield, they have the ability to perch on power lines and windowsills. Traditionally, hummingbirds are seen in many cultures as bringers of joy, beauty and fearlessness. Some Native American tribes believe them to represent the physical form of a spirit guide. These creatures, which are associated with positivity and trust, have been replicated into ominous machines. In the future, will we ever be truly alone? Is the need for surveillance so important that we sacrifice our privacy? If we find ourselves faced eye to eye with a hummingbird drone, how will we know who is looking back at us?

This work was inspired by research presentations on the topic, “Cyber security” by Dr. Yier Jin, UCF Professor and undergraduate STEM student Grant Hernandez, in Professor Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class.

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Erica Sobrack

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The Grid - Kristin Rucker

The pointer finger - a symbol of control and connectivity Protrudes into space. As statuesque sundials Point to the direction of the universe with your telling shadow As Stonehenge, a vague analogy To our human advance As a computer, I map systems of interaction Colors and shapes of different origin interact, Mapping out the spread of information between subgroups.

This work was inspired by research presentations on the topic, “Cyber security” by Dr. Yier Jin, UCF Professor and undergraduate STEM student Grant Hernandez, in Professor Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class.

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Motherboard - Moey Hewitt

A motherboard is the main printed circuit board (PCB) found in computers and other expandable systems. It holds many of the crucial electronic components of the system, such as the central processing unit (CPU) and memory, and provides connectors for other peripherals. Unlike a backplane, a motherboard contains significant sub-systems such as the processor and other components..... The figure in the painting symbolically represents the Motherboard. The mandalas around her are the subsystems that make up the Motherboard.

This work was inspired by research presentations on the topic, “Cyber security” by Dr. Yier Jin, UCF Professor and undergraduate STEM student Grant Hernandez, in Professor Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class.

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Cyber Security - Michael Smart

The use of cloud computing and storage have become commonplace within our society. Although the name itself possesses an intangible, almost ethereal quality, the Internet makes cloud computing possible. The Internet is probably not thought of as possessing any physicality, occupying a physical space in time. But, in fact, it does. The machine-servers, routers, cooling systems, backup batteries and generators are housed in buildings all over the world. This painting is my interpretation of the Internet and cloud storage by way of visual metaphor.

This work was inspired by research presentations on the topic, “Cyber security” by Dr. Yier Jin, UCF Professor and undergraduate STEM student Grant Hernandez, in Professor Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class.

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ABC, 123: The 25 Infamous Passwords - Ann Hennessy

After listening to Dr. Yier Jun and Grant Hernandez’ research presentations on cyber security, I became immediately drawn to the concept that many facets of securing military databases to personal accounts lead to an individual’s unsecure internet presence. That led me to consider the art of choosing a secure, yet quick way to remember a password for my own accounts. In this day and age remembering passwords can be challenging. I find myself sometimes getting too creative an unable to recall my own passwords. According to the researchers, the prompts to help recall our passwords usually are cues from our childhood. For example, what was the name of your first pet? What street did you grow up on? Who was your childhood best friend? All of these questions take me back to my childhood, especially to kindergarten, where ABC's and 123's were learned and embedded. This mixed media painting is essentially a representation of a password. The image on the canvas is embedded with 25 of the most infamous passwords used by the majority of the population using the Internet according to current research in cyber security. The duck, the tree, ABC and 123 all trigger a memory from my childhood – how similar are they to yours?

This work was inspired by research presentations on the topic, “Cyber security” by Dr. Yier Jin, UCF Professor and undergraduate STEM student Grant Hernandez, in Professor Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class.

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Trespassing - Andrea Villafuerta

On the one hand, the Internet is a great source of knowledge in which with one click we can find information about anything or anyone. Yet, the user is often intruding on someone else’s life without his or her permission. We are aware of Cyber Security but we often tend to ignore the idea of what it actually involves. As a result of the research presentations and my own investigations, I have become more aware of the dangers we all face in regards to the security of the Internet. With this in mind I decided to illustrate the feeling of being intruded upon. The woman sits on the floor looking into her computer, researching something and glances towards us in surprise, as she perceives that someone is looking at her. Her gaze lands upon us, the viewers, as we catch her in a private moment in her room. At the same time, there is a man lurking in the shadows. He is symbolic of what we open ourselves up to when we browse the Internet. He is unrecognizable behind a screen of dark colors. He could be a hacker, brought into her room by the use of her laptop or he could actually be a presence in her room. He may be waiting for an unsuspected moment to attack like someone who would steal your identity. We, as viewers, become part of the composition. We gaze into this woman’s life, just like we look into the Internet to search for people. But, she is already connected to her computer. Perhaps she is looking at the life of someone else while simultaneously, someone is watching her. The cycle is more foreboding than we normally realize.

This work was inspired by research presentations on the topic, “Cyber security” by Dr. Yier Jin, UCF Professor and undergraduate STEM student Grant Hernandez, in Professor Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class.

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Social Media - Juan Pineda

We can’t escape the complexity of what it’s like to live in this world and how we perceive our lives within it. Social media allows our lives to be displayed to those we choose to share it with. I'm not opposed to it because it’s my truth, yet sometimes I’m frightened by the thought of losing my grip on reality due to using social media. It may seem ironic, but I am coming to realize that perhaps we aren’t being truthful to ourselves as humans. Perhaps the media and television got to us. Perhaps we just really want to invent our own reality TV shows in our minds. I am coming to realize that we are losing our sense of humanity because of the control social media has on our lives and our decision-making. Because we exist in internet time, it’s who we’ve become. This painting is intended to illustrate a metaphor. It represents one simple thought by a human in a state of deep relaxation. Just below the illustration of the human, three out of one billion connections are visible. This is meant to illustrate our connection with the world in a global system of computer networks. The human stretches itself towards a small nest of eggs. The eggs are a symbol of life and they are perfectly still. One egg appears perfect while two are discolored, suggesting disconnect between the human and the eggs as the human passes through the space. I try not to be discouraged. We are living this reality. Social Media will just keep evolving.

This work was inspired by research presentations on the topic, “Cyber security” by Dr. Yier Jin, UCF Professor and undergraduate STEM student Grant Hernandez, in Professor Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class.

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The Breach - Shuyu Liu

In response to the Dr. Jin’s research in Cyber Security, this image was created to illustrate the world of technology’s constant struggles. Though the advancement of technology brought convenience into people’s lives, our privacy is also greatly exposed as we connect ourselves with the Internet, smart technologies, and “The Cloud.” This painting represents my interpretation of existing conflicts when our privacy is constantly threatened by the unseen harm of hackers, viruses, malware, etc.… while we rely on defense mechanisms that we fail to comprehend. The ignorance and negligence in understanding the safety and boundaries of today’s technology can only mean potential harm to our privacy. Even more extreme is the possible destruction of an individual’s personal image, which can destroy the perceptions of an individual’s life. The challenge in making this image lies in the balance of the prominent danger of maintaining an online presence in comparison to the tranquility of the scenery. In this painting, however grand and sturdy the dam may appear to be, it is only a façade as the water finds its way to the city where people are unaware of the dangers awaiting them.

This work was inspired by research presentations on the topic, “Cyber security” by Dr. Yier Jin, UCF Professor and undergraduate STEM student Grant Hernandez, in Professor Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class.

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Michael Alvarez

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The Cloud - Darragh Sinnott

In the digital age the individual is prone to socializing, learning, consuming and defining themselves by means of online media. Some speculate the future of an online consciousness in which the individual exists online. I am presenting imagery critical of online consciousness and the dangers in cyber security. By investing one’s existence onto a digital network of any kind they open themselves to many unknown entities.

This work was inspired by research presentations on the topic, “Cyber security” by Dr. Yier Jin, UCF Professor and undergraduate STEM student Grant Hernandez, in Professor Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class.

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Digital Coffee - Michael Mangos

Ignorance of subject matter seemed an appropriate topic for a painting of something so complex and vague a theme as “cyber security”. Paint seems like the wrong medium because painting is old, dusty and is an inappropriate reaction to things that happen in fractions of a second in a digital, invisible space. However, the one thing painting and the subject matter share is that the greater population is ignorant of both. I wanted to avoid losing the attention of the viewer with incomprehensible “cyber landscapes” where monolithic servers dominate nature because that seemed both cliché and overconfident. Instead, a picture of the comforting and familiar is slowly being invaded by our modern conveniences. This painting is meant to be humorous. I’m paranoid about our electronics yet have no hesitation when it comes to buying and using them.

This work was inspired by research presentations on the topic, “Cyber security” by Dr. Yier Jin, UCF Professor and undergraduate STEM student Grant Hernandez, in Professor Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class.

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Untitled - Taylor Menzel

After learning more about Cyber Security, I thought about the exposure we leave ourselves open to even in our own homes. In this painting, I am illustrating a scene where a girl is left exposed in the privacy and comfort of her bedroom. Her computer is casting a light into the room from its place on a desk in the far foreground of this scene. For inspiration, I looked at Edward Hopper’s paintings from the 1940’s and 50’s, which use light to create a dramatic mood within an interior space. In this painting I used Hopper’s technique of layering colors to create a sensation of deep shadows and directional light to support the subject.

This work was inspired by research presentations on the topic, “Cyber security” by Dr. Yier Jin, UCF Professor and undergraduate STEM student Grant Hernandez, in Professor Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class.

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Untitled - Yuka Moribe

The subject of cyber security inspired this painting. There is a certain level of paranoia a person experiences at the thought of one’s identity being watched and “stolen” by others. This thought intrigued me to paint an image with exaggerated eye-like elements. The image suggests the fear of being watched by unknown viewers on the Internet.

This work was inspired by research presentations on the topic, “Cyber security” by Dr. Yier Jin, UCF Professor and undergraduate STEM student Grant Hernandez, in Professor Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class.

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DARPA - Kirstin Mais

Cyber security comes down to one question: How much are we as a society willing to forfeit to an unknowing world? The figure represented in this painting has no identifiable markings and is not shrouded by clothing, which leaves one's identity in question. The eyes and face exist, but are concealed. The sense of a foreground, middle ground, and background is eliminated, so the scene presented is unknown. Placed on and within a grid of unlimited channels of data, the figure’s personal traits are extracted and sent to an unknown location. The use of 0's and 1's represents data in a stencil style symbolizing military tagging. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, is part of the U.S. military which initiated the concept of the Internet. It is through the system DARPA developed that the coded data is transcribed to identify the unnamed figure.

This work was inspired by research presentations on the topic, “Cyber security” by Dr. Yier Jin, UCF Professor and undergraduate STEM student Grant Hernandez, in Professor Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class.

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Unit J-033 - Alejandro Ocampo

In recent decades our human integration with technology has accelerated at an alarming rate, starting with the connectivity of the Internet to our recent symbiosis with Google glass. We are inherently compelled to improve our way of life. Technology is the most logical approach to achieving this directive. However, where will it stop? Our brains already operate as organic computers, how long before we have cables to replace each of our senses? How long will it be until our bodies are interchangeable hardware and our consciousness exists in a digital realm? This concept may appear corrupt, however history has proven humanity has an affinity for corruption. Perhaps, we are programed that way.

This work was inspired by research presentations on the topic, “Cyber security” by Dr. Yier Jin, UCF Professor and undergraduate STEM student Grant Hernandez, in Professor Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class.

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Security - Jordan Senarens

After hearing the STEM presentation on Internet Security, I immediately considered what physically securing the Internet would look like. In this painting, a landscape is encrypted into optical cubes using a pattern of diamonds and triangles. The landscape is visible, but obstructed by an integrated two-dimensional space.

This work was inspired by research presentations on the topic, “Cyber security” by Dr. Yier Jin, UCF Professor and undergraduate STEM student Grant Hernandez, in Professor Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class.

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