iCubed

Spring 2015 STEAM Paintings

NSF

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No.0963146. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

UCF

Facsimiles - Forrest De Blois

These paintings mirror a kind of reverse scientific method, starting with a set of original objects (a mass produced bird house, the head of a mass produced owl dummy and an oak tree branch, twisted around to a different angle in each painting), then rendered at differing sizes and levels of detail on three canvases. In aggregate, the paintings provide the viewer with space to approximate what the original objects looked like, their size, specific textures etc. This was inspired by the process of the scientific method, the standard application of at least three repetitions of an experiment, based on a hypothesis and creating data points that lead the tester to an idea of how things work previously and otherwise intangible and inaccessible.

This work was inspired by research presentations on the topics of Microgravity and Planetary Science (study of planets, asteroids, comets, moons, rings and their origin and evolution) by UCF Professor, Dr. Josh Colwell and ICubed fellow and undergraduate research student, Chris Barsoum in Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class.

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Untitled - John Currie

When we observe the world around us, we think that everything we see is happening now, but that's not true. Light has to travel through space and time before it enters our eyes, therefore what we perceive as “now” actually already happened. Just looking up at the stars at night with the naked eye we can see things that happened thousands of years ago, but our experience of this phenomenon on earth is on a much smaller scale. To make this more tangible, I imagined what would happen if light speed were slowed down drastically. By overlapping two different frames of the same group of figures as they walk by from right to left, the first frame being “now” in our perception, and the second frame (approximately 1 second later) being “now” from the perspective of the people walking by, I have captured what was actually happening in one moment.

This work was inspired by research presentations on the topics of Microgravity and Planetary Science (study of planets, asteroids, comets, moons, rings and their origin and evolution) by UCF Professor, Dr. Josh Colwell and ICubed fellow and undergraduate research student, Chris Barsoum in Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class.

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Mandala - Moey Hewitt

Mandalas are geometric patterns that represent the universe. In order to create a mandala, one must start from the center and expand the design outwards. The universe expands in the same way. After the Big Bang, space began expanding outward, and galaxies continue to grow farther and farther apart because of this. Through the process of examining a mandala section by section, a person is symbolically guided through space to the essence of reality.

This work was inspired by research presentations on the topics of Microgravity and Planetary Science (study of planets, asteroids, comets, moons, rings and their origin and evolution) by UCF Professor, Dr. Josh Colwell and ICubed fellow and undergraduate research student, Chris Barsoum in Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class.

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Icarus - Theresa Lucey

The big bang dispersed the building blocks that make up the universe. That same stardust fabricates the elements within all of mankind. The carbon that constructs my pastels is the same carbon within me. I imagined a figure smashing its head into negative space, like a sperm into an egg, in celestial enlightenment and echoing the stars around it. Unlike the Icarus of myth, this Icarus cannot fall for he hangs suspended, and therefore must overshadow foolishness with consciousness. I wished to capture the emotions I experience when I immerse myself in scientific thought.

This work was inspired by research presentations on the topics of Microgravity and Planetary Science (study of planets, asteroids, comets, moons, rings and their origin and evolution) by UCF Professor, Dr. Josh Colwell and ICubed fellow and undergraduate research student, Chris Barsoum in Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class.

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Cybersecutiy - Nick Kalemba

From Dr. Colwell and Chris Barsoum's speech, I was given a brief but enthralling glimpse into the research he and his students are currently conducting in the field of microgravity. Their research focuses on measuring the particle ejecta created by dropping objects of various materials into a substrate, in different states of gravity. These experiments are composed of an impact material in a small container and an impacting object carefully held in suspension above. I used the concept of potential energy held within the impact object as a departure point. In response to their research, I sought to create a piece that mirrored some of the concepts they're exploring while commenting on the relationship between art and science, and the obligation of the artist to the audience. The scientist and the artist follow a similar journey through their processes, one defined by the birth of an idea, which leads them to action and experimentation, and finally an evaluation of what it is they have created.

This work was inspired by research presentations on the topics of Microgravity and Planetary Science (study of planets, asteroids, comets, moons, rings and their origin and evolution) by UCF Professor, Dr. Josh Colwell and ICubed fellow and undergraduate research student, Chris Barsoum in Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class.

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Humankind - Nick Kalemba

From Dr. Colwell and Chris Barsoum's speech, I was given a brief but enthralling glimpse into the research he and his students are currently conducting in the field of microgravity. Their research focuses on measuring the particle ejecta created by dropping objects of various materials into a substrate, in different states of gravity. These experiments are composed of an impact material in a small container and an impacting object carefully held in suspension above. I used the concept of potential energy held within the impact object as a departure point. In response to their research, I sought to create a piece that mirrored some of the concepts they're exploring while commenting on the relationship between art and science, and the obligation of the artist to the audience. The scientist and the artist follow a similar journey through their processes, one defined by the birth of an idea, which leads them to action and experimentation, and finally an evaluation of what it is they have created.

This work was inspired by research presentations on the topics of Microgravity and Planetary Science (study of planets, asteroids, comets, moons, rings and their origin and evolution) by UCF Professor, Dr. Josh Colwell and ICubed fellow and undergraduate research student, Chris Barsoum in Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class.

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Accidental Discharge Impossible - Nick Kalemba

From Dr. Colwell and Chris Barsoum's speech, I was given a brief but enthralling glimpse into the research he and his students are currently conducting in the field of microgravity. Their research focuses on measuring the particle ejecta created by dropping objects of various materials into a substrate, in different states of gravity. These experiments are composed of an impact material in a small container and an impacting object carefully held in suspension above. I used the concept of potential energy held within the impact object as a departure point. In response to their research, I sought to create a piece that mirrored some of the concepts they're exploring while commenting on the relationship between art and science, and the obligation of the artist to the audience. The scientist and the artist follow a similar journey through their processes, one defined by the birth of an idea, which leads them to action and experimentation, and finally an evaluation of what it is they have created.

This work was inspired by research presentations on the topics of Microgravity and Planetary Science (study of planets, asteroids, comets, moons, rings and their origin and evolution) by UCF Professor, Dr. Josh Colwell and ICubed fellow and undergraduate research student, Chris Barsoum in Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class.

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Nebula - Jordan Senarens

These two paintings suggest the massive difference in scale between micro and macro physics. A nebula is the birthplace of stars, which relate to particles on the micro level. I broke up space with a grid that forms three optical cubes folding into each other to represent the nebula’s expansion.

This work was inspired by research presentations on the topics of Microgravity and Planetary Science (study of planets, asteroids, comets, moons, rings and their origin and evolution) by UCF Professor, Dr. Josh Colwell and ICubed fellow and undergraduate research student, Chris Barsoum in Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class.

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Probability Function - Jordan Senerans

According to Schrodinger’s Probability Function, particles act as a wave rather than a static object. When particles pass through two vertical slits onto a flat plane several feet away, their locations can be predicted by imagining the particles traveling as intersecting waves. The crests of the combined waves determine the probability of where the particle will land. In my painting, the concentration of particles is represented by lighter value.

This work was inspired by research presentations on the topics of Microgravity and Planetary Science (study of planets, asteroids, comets, moons, rings and their origin and evolution) by UCF Professor, Dr. Josh Colwell and ICubed fellow and undergraduate research student, Chris Barsoum in Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class.

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Looking Forward - Olivia Keene

Countless planets exist in the universe, each potentially different from the other. Odds are, there are other planets with life, but who's to say that they look like Earth? This painting embodies how visually different planets can be, and the anticipation involved in pioneering and exploring during the Space Age.

Countless planets exist in the universe, each potentially different from the other. Odds are, there are other planets with life, but who's to say that they look like Earth? This painting embodies how visually different planets can be, and the anticipation involved in pioneering and exploring during the Space Age.

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Untitled - Ericka Sobrack

Quantum entanglement is a quantum mechanical phenomenon in which the quantum states of two or more objects have to be described with reference to each other, even though the individual objects may be spatially separated. - Quantum Entanglement. Science Daily. Web. 13 Mar. 2015 I chose to depict Quantum Entanglement/ Teleportation by placing two figures in an interdimensional environment. Even though these entangled figures are not local with one another, they can no longer be described as “separate” from one another. Instead, they are expressed as a sum, or a system. If Entanglement is broken, both units of the system collapse. In addition to this scientific anomaly, Entanglement, I thought it would be appropriate to also illustrate and depict my interpretation of The Doppler Effect. The Doppler Effect is used to describe whether or not an object is moving towards or away from the viewer. When an object moves towards you, there is a shift in light to a higher frequency (blue) on the Electromagnetic Spectrum. When an object is moving away from the viewer, there is a lower frequency of light emitted, red. These can be described as Blue and Red Shifts respectfully. I decided to translate these theories into my own comprehension of what Quantum Teleportation may look like visually.

This work was inspired by research presentations on the topics of Microgravity and Planetary Science (study of planets, asteroids, comets, moons, rings and their origin and evolution) by UCF Professor, Dr. Josh Colwell and ICubed fellow and undergraduate research student, Chris Barsoum in Carla Poindexter’s advanced painting class.

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Fruiplanets - Andrea Villafuert

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Iris - Shuyu Liu

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