iCubed

Spring 2014 STEAM Photographs

NSF

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No.0963146. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

UCF

Gown - Jenn Allen

The STEAM presentation on solid waste management exposed me to how much waste is produced in this country and that we all need to work together to solve this issue. The average American generates 4.3lbs of trash every day. Prior to this project I was not aware of all the different materials that can be recycled. By creating this gown I portray how overlooked everyday objects can be transformed into something else. I reclaimed plastic and paper to create an elegant gown and then photographed it in a way that high fashion would be photographed.

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Every Ten Feet - Kirstin Bencomo

It is lore that Walt Disney conducted an experiment to see how long patrons to his beloved Disney World would hold on to an article of trash before simply dropping it. He discovered that the furthest a person would go with trash in their hand was ten feet. You will find a trashcan every ten feet when walking through any part of any of the six Disney World parks. What most do not realize is that the trashcans are seamlessly designed along with the rest of the park. The trashcans are essentially Disney characters in and of themselves. They fit in with each of the worlds so easily that most do not even notice their existence. In a way, the Disney trashcans are the glue that hold the parks together.

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Untitled - Lana Lasher

The image was constructed from my discarded prints over this year. I physical and digitally wove several images together.

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Diver - Ian Adams

Diver says: “Yes to recycling!” With solid waste at an all time high and rising we need to say “Fuck You” to waste production and take a lesson from the diver, the original recycler; those people turning one man’s trash into another man’s treasure. Reduce, re-use, and recycle!

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Blowing Smoke - Joshua Sweet

My piece is meant to address the general public's ambiguous understanding of the purpose and products that come out of the local utilities commission. My concept its to show the relationship between government recycling efforts and the people it affects in a pronounced and blithe manner. I hope to give people a new understanding of the reasons for the unfamiliar buildings that breach the local skyline and in turn create a respect and awareness for the industry.

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Bathing - Diego Martinez-Conde

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Sand - Stephanie Thomas

This image displays a mosaic of found pieces that have fused together to create a stunning scene. The mixture of nature and manufactured fragments creates a sense of movement. The viewer is constantly fascinated to different sections within the image. The sand and glass show the cycle of life for these objects. The glass has returned to its birthplace and merged with its own materials.

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Hidden in Plain Sight - Nicole Dieguez

My photograph explores the invisibility of poverty in our society. This photograph demonstrates how little we pay attention to something we suggest as a substantial issue of our society. We have become so desensitized to these images. This desensitization allows us to simply drive right pass this type of scene.

Our vision of a home might not include a shed such as this, but there are people who call this home. This place goes unnoticed every day, even though it is just a few feet away from a busy road. The electricity lines and suburban neighborhood sign show us that this scene could be found in our backyard. This home, like the issue of poverty, is able to hide in plain sight. This photograph brings it front and center.

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Castaway - Naomi Montilla

Castaway came to me as I was sitting at the beach enjoying the Florida sun. It amazed me that somebody would throw away a can of beer out to sea knowing that the trash cans were not too far from the water. As I sat there wondering what will happen to this beer can? Where will it go? How will this beer hurt the environment? As I continue to watch the beer can go out to sea it frustrated me that somebody would do this. As fast as the ocean was trying to swallow the beer can, I jumped on my feet and run to save the ocean. By doing this project I learned how quick our trashcan get away from us. I was frustrated.

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Untitled - Maria Dampier

28°N 34’1.8”, -81°W 11’12.9”

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The Trash Queen - Heather Hubbard

My work creates an absurd metaphor that highlights a broad generalization of much of American society’s attitude in regards to the rising problems stemming from the lack of attention that is paid to help facilitate effective waste management. By removing refuse from its decorative urn and putting it in an unexpected spotlight it speaks to the blind eye many people have to the waste they create on a daily basis.

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Bottle Caps - C. Ross Brackin

In this series of intimate portraits of everyday bottle caps, I sought to utilize what was discarded to create an artifact or documentation of that object's beauty. It caused me to look closer at the overwhelming worldwide human problem: waste. Trash is the byproduct of human consumption, and defined as such by our disowning it to landfills and discarding it within our environment. It makes sense to me as an artist to recycle trash by repacking it for consumers as art, thereby re-infusing it with desirable qualities. In any regard, we remain connected too much of our waste, which we can neither fully ignore nor remove from existence except through the passage of time. Trash, then, is all in how we look at it, and whether or not we do something with it. We can actively choose to renew, reuse and recycle, as well as repurpose. Or, we can ruin our reality with the remnants of our refuse, should we resist our collective responsibilities.

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Bottle Caps - C. Ross Brackin

In this series of intimate portraits of everyday bottle caps, I sought to utilize what was discarded to create an artifact or documentation of that object's beauty. It caused me to look closer at the overwhelming worldwide human problem: waste. Trash is the byproduct of human consumption, and defined as such by our disowning it to landfills and discarding it within our environment. It makes sense to me as an artist to recycle trash by repacking it for consumers as art, thereby re-infusing it with desirable qualities. In any regard, we remain connected too much of our waste, which we can neither fully ignore nor remove from existence except through the passage of time. Trash, then, is all in how we look at it, and whether or not we do something with it. We can actively choose to renew, reuse and recycle, as well as repurpose. Or, we can ruin our reality with the remnants of our refuse, should we resist our collective responsibilities.

×

Bottle Caps - C. Ross Brackin

In this series of intimate portraits of everyday bottle caps, I sought to utilize what was discarded to create an artifact or documentation of that object's beauty. It caused me to look closer at the overwhelming worldwide human problem: waste. Trash is the byproduct of human consumption, and defined as such by our disowning it to landfills and discarding it within our environment. It makes sense to me as an artist to recycle trash by repacking it for consumers as art, thereby re-infusing it with desirable qualities. In any regard, we remain connected too much of our waste, which we can neither fully ignore nor remove from existence except through the passage of time. Trash, then, is all in how we look at it, and whether or not we do something with it. We can actively choose to renew, reuse and recycle, as well as repurpose. Or, we can ruin our reality with the remnants of our refuse, should we resist our collective responsibilities.

×

Bottle Caps - C. Ross Brackin

In this series of intimate portraits of everyday bottle caps, I sought to utilize what was discarded to create an artifact or documentation of that object's beauty. It caused me to look closer at the overwhelming worldwide human problem: waste. Trash is the byproduct of human consumption, and defined as such by our disowning it to landfills and discarding it within our environment. It makes sense to me as an artist to recycle trash by repacking it for consumers as art, thereby re-infusing it with desirable qualities. In any regard, we remain connected too much of our waste, which we can neither fully ignore nor remove from existence except through the passage of time. Trash, then, is all in how we look at it, and whether or not we do something with it. We can actively choose to renew, reuse and recycle, as well as repurpose. Or, we can ruin our reality with the remnants of our refuse, should we resist our collective responsibilities.

×

Bottle Caps - C. Ross Brackin

In this series of intimate portraits of everyday bottle caps, I sought to utilize what was discarded to create an artifact or documentation of that object's beauty. It caused me to look closer at the overwhelming worldwide human problem: waste. Trash is the byproduct of human consumption, and defined as such by our disowning it to landfills and discarding it within our environment. It makes sense to me as an artist to recycle trash by repacking it for consumers as art, thereby re-infusing it with desirable qualities. In any regard, we remain connected too much of our waste, which we can neither fully ignore nor remove from existence except through the passage of time. Trash, then, is all in how we look at it, and whether or not we do something with it. We can actively choose to renew, reuse and recycle, as well as repurpose. Or, we can ruin our reality with the remnants of our refuse, should we resist our collective responsibilities.

×

Bottle Caps - C. Ross Brackin

In this series of intimate portraits of everyday bottle caps, I sought to utilize what was discarded to create an artifact or documentation of that object's beauty. It caused me to look closer at the overwhelming worldwide human problem: waste. Trash is the byproduct of human consumption, and defined as such by our disowning it to landfills and discarding it within our environment. It makes sense to me as an artist to recycle trash by repacking it for consumers as art, thereby re-infusing it with desirable qualities. In any regard, we remain connected too much of our waste, which we can neither fully ignore nor remove from existence except through the passage of time. Trash, then, is all in how we look at it, and whether or not we do something with it. We can actively choose to renew, reuse and recycle, as well as repurpose. Or, we can ruin our reality with the remnants of our refuse, should we resist our collective responsibilities.

×

Bottle Caps - C. Ross Brackin

In this series of intimate portraits of everyday bottle caps, I sought to utilize what was discarded to create an artifact or documentation of that object's beauty. It caused me to look closer at the overwhelming worldwide human problem: waste. Trash is the byproduct of human consumption, and defined as such by our disowning it to landfills and discarding it within our environment. It makes sense to me as an artist to recycle trash by repacking it for consumers as art, thereby re-infusing it with desirable qualities. In any regard, we remain connected too much of our waste, which we can neither fully ignore nor remove from existence except through the passage of time. Trash, then, is all in how we look at it, and whether or not we do something with it. We can actively choose to renew, reuse and recycle, as well as repurpose. Or, we can ruin our reality with the remnants of our refuse, should we resist our collective responsibilities.

×

Bottle Caps - C. Ross Brackin

In this series of intimate portraits of everyday bottle caps, I sought to utilize what was discarded to create an artifact or documentation of that object's beauty. It caused me to look closer at the overwhelming worldwide human problem: waste. Trash is the byproduct of human consumption, and defined as such by our disowning it to landfills and discarding it within our environment. It makes sense to me as an artist to recycle trash by repacking it for consumers as art, thereby re-infusing it with desirable qualities. In any regard, we remain connected too much of our waste, which we can neither fully ignore nor remove from existence except through the passage of time. Trash, then, is all in how we look at it, and whether or not we do something with it. We can actively choose to renew, reuse and recycle, as well as repurpose. Or, we can ruin our reality with the remnants of our refuse, should we resist our collective responsibilities.

×

Bottle Caps - C. Ross Brackin

In this series of intimate portraits of everyday bottle caps, I sought to utilize what was discarded to create an artifact or documentation of that object's beauty. It caused me to look closer at the overwhelming worldwide human problem: waste. Trash is the byproduct of human consumption, and defined as such by our disowning it to landfills and discarding it within our environment. It makes sense to me as an artist to recycle trash by repacking it for consumers as art, thereby re-infusing it with desirable qualities. In any regard, we remain connected too much of our waste, which we can neither fully ignore nor remove from existence except through the passage of time. Trash, then, is all in how we look at it, and whether or not we do something with it. We can actively choose to renew, reuse and recycle, as well as repurpose. Or, we can ruin our reality with the remnants of our refuse, should we resist our collective responsibilities.

×

Bottle Caps - C. Ross Brackin

In this series of intimate portraits of everyday bottle caps, I sought to utilize what was discarded to create an artifact or documentation of that object's beauty. It caused me to look closer at the overwhelming worldwide human problem: waste. Trash is the byproduct of human consumption, and defined as such by our disowning it to landfills and discarding it within our environment. It makes sense to me as an artist to recycle trash by repacking it for consumers as art, thereby re-infusing it with desirable qualities. In any regard, we remain connected too much of our waste, which we can neither fully ignore nor remove from existence except through the passage of time. Trash, then, is all in how we look at it, and whether or not we do something with it. We can actively choose to renew, reuse and recycle, as well as repurpose. Or, we can ruin our reality with the remnants of our refuse, should we resist our collective responsibilities.

×

Bottle Caps - C. Ross Brackin

In this series of intimate portraits of everyday bottle caps, I sought to utilize what was discarded to create an artifact or documentation of that object's beauty. It caused me to look closer at the overwhelming worldwide human problem: waste. Trash is the byproduct of human consumption, and defined as such by our disowning it to landfills and discarding it within our environment. It makes sense to me as an artist to recycle trash by repacking it for consumers as art, thereby re-infusing it with desirable qualities. In any regard, we remain connected too much of our waste, which we can neither fully ignore nor remove from existence except through the passage of time. Trash, then, is all in how we look at it, and whether or not we do something with it. We can actively choose to renew, reuse and recycle, as well as repurpose. Or, we can ruin our reality with the remnants of our refuse, should we resist our collective responsibilities.

×

Bottle Caps - C. Ross Brackin

In this series of intimate portraits of everyday bottle caps, I sought to utilize what was discarded to create an artifact or documentation of that object's beauty. It caused me to look closer at the overwhelming worldwide human problem: waste. Trash is the byproduct of human consumption, and defined as such by our disowning it to landfills and discarding it within our environment. It makes sense to me as an artist to recycle trash by repacking it for consumers as art, thereby re-infusing it with desirable qualities. In any regard, we remain connected too much of our waste, which we can neither fully ignore nor remove from existence except through the passage of time. Trash, then, is all in how we look at it, and whether or not we do something with it. We can actively choose to renew, reuse and recycle, as well as repurpose. Or, we can ruin our reality with the remnants of our refuse, should we resist our collective responsibilities.

×

Bottle Caps - C. Ross Brackin

In this series of intimate portraits of everyday bottle caps, I sought to utilize what was discarded to create an artifact or documentation of that object's beauty. It caused me to look closer at the overwhelming worldwide human problem: waste. Trash is the byproduct of human consumption, and defined as such by our disowning it to landfills and discarding it within our environment. It makes sense to me as an artist to recycle trash by repacking it for consumers as art, thereby re-infusing it with desirable qualities. In any regard, we remain connected too much of our waste, which we can neither fully ignore nor remove from existence except through the passage of time. Trash, then, is all in how we look at it, and whether or not we do something with it. We can actively choose to renew, reuse and recycle, as well as repurpose. Or, we can ruin our reality with the remnants of our refuse, should we resist our collective responsibilities.

×

Bottle Caps - C. Ross Brackin

In this series of intimate portraits of everyday bottle caps, I sought to utilize what was discarded to create an artifact or documentation of that object's beauty. It caused me to look closer at the overwhelming worldwide human problem: waste. Trash is the byproduct of human consumption, and defined as such by our disowning it to landfills and discarding it within our environment. It makes sense to me as an artist to recycle trash by repacking it for consumers as art, thereby re-infusing it with desirable qualities. In any regard, we remain connected too much of our waste, which we can neither fully ignore nor remove from existence except through the passage of time. Trash, then, is all in how we look at it, and whether or not we do something with it. We can actively choose to renew, reuse and recycle, as well as repurpose. Or, we can ruin our reality with the remnants of our refuse, should we resist our collective responsibilities.

×

Bottle Caps - C. Ross Brackin

In this series of intimate portraits of everyday bottle caps, I sought to utilize what was discarded to create an artifact or documentation of that object's beauty. It caused me to look closer at the overwhelming worldwide human problem: waste. Trash is the byproduct of human consumption, and defined as such by our disowning it to landfills and discarding it within our environment. It makes sense to me as an artist to recycle trash by repacking it for consumers as art, thereby re-infusing it with desirable qualities. In any regard, we remain connected too much of our waste, which we can neither fully ignore nor remove from existence except through the passage of time. Trash, then, is all in how we look at it, and whether or not we do something with it. We can actively choose to renew, reuse and recycle, as well as repurpose. Or, we can ruin our reality with the remnants of our refuse, should we resist our collective responsibilities.

×

Bottle Caps - C. Ross Brackin

In this series of intimate portraits of everyday bottle caps, I sought to utilize what was discarded to create an artifact or documentation of that object's beauty. It caused me to look closer at the overwhelming worldwide human problem: waste. Trash is the byproduct of human consumption, and defined as such by our disowning it to landfills and discarding it within our environment. It makes sense to me as an artist to recycle trash by repacking it for consumers as art, thereby re-infusing it with desirable qualities. In any regard, we remain connected too much of our waste, which we can neither fully ignore nor remove from existence except through the passage of time. Trash, then, is all in how we look at it, and whether or not we do something with it. We can actively choose to renew, reuse and recycle, as well as repurpose. Or, we can ruin our reality with the remnants of our refuse, should we resist our collective responsibilities.

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