iCubed

Spring 2012 STEAM Posters

One of the objectives of ICubed is to inform the UCF Community about scientific concepts. The project is meeting this objective by funding the STEAM Gallery Initiative which is an activity that encourages STEM researchers to expand their thinking and find ways to communicate their science to non-STEM audiences. In order to best communicate STEM research conducted at UCF, ICubed created teams of two, composed of a student from a STEM discipline and a student from the School of Visual Arts and Design (SVAD). Over the spring 2012 semester, the student teams worked together to produce a poster that was visually appealing and understandable to the lay person. The final posters were presented at the State of STEAM event in April 2012, and later at the STEM EXPO in November 2012. The teams also had the opportunity to further show their work by entering the NSF International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge in the fall of 2012.

NSF

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No.0963146. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

UCF

Dual-Polymer Water Treatment - Elizabeth Williamson

Abel's research is in the testing of two dual-polymer water treatment systems. The polymers are made with chitosan and cause flocculation among sediment particles. The systems were created to filter runoff from construction sites and cities that would otherwise kill fish and their eggs when it reached lakes.

I went with a style that was very simple and straightforward because the dual-polymer system is also relatively simple. I had to find a way to fit the system onto the poster, which applied in a real-world scenario, would be possibly miles long. This fact led to the poster not representing the system literally, but more as a diagram.

This poster was inspired by the research of Dr. Manoj Chopra and his student Abel Diaz from the Department of Civil Environmental and Construction Engineering. Elizabeth Williamson's graphic design work was supervised by Dr. Joo Kim, Associate Professor in the School of Visual Arts and Design.

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Treating Cancer with Gold - Lidia Kawashima

Research on anti-cancer agents is even more imperative due to the chemotherapeutic resistance we are facing. Ultimately, the development of gold compound drugs can aid in the battle against cancer, providing a positive outlook on the medical advancements that can be made possible in the near future.

The poster is meant to demonstrate the effects of the gold compound on cancerous cells with the use of contrasting colors and light. The main image exemplifies the process further in detail, visually representing the intercalation of the drug into the DNA. This graphic interpretation is intended to promote understanding and portray the importance and potential of this research.

This poster was inspired by the research of Dr. Mark T. Muller and his student Alexander Fagenson from the Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences. Lidia Kawashima's graphic design work was supervised by Dr. Joo Kim, Associate Professor in the School of Visual Arts and Design.

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Structural Health Monitoring - Uyen Thai

Alex's research is with Structural Health monitoring, which is a new technology that is applied to maintain the functionality of everyday structures. This technology passes information along to a data acquisition system, a computer which will convert this information into readable data for the overseer.

I used pen and ink, which I digitally enhanced, to communicate the concept of Structural Health Monitoring. My work narrates to the viewer the process of measuring structural integrity through the use of sensors. The outcome of this design is to convey the importance of the monitoring system aiding to prohibit any anomalies, damage or deterioration.

This poster was inspired by the research of Dr. Necati Catbas from the College of Engineering and his student Alex Hanhold. Uyen Thai's graphic design work was supervised by Dr. Joo Kim, Associate Professor in the School of Visual Arts and Design.

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Regeneration in Hypopomidae, South American Knifefish - Emile Kanhai

This illustration is based on the South American knifefish's (family Hypopomidae) use of its tail and electric organ to discharge a current into its environment that it uses to sense predators, detect prey, and attract a potential mate. This remarkable adaptation to generate this signal is particularly useful in the murky waters of the Amazon basin and at night for these nocturnal fish. Another unique feature of this group of fish is to regenerate tissue that has been damaged.

The graphic design responds to the unique visual experience of viewing these fish swim and interact with their environment. In addition to their ability to release an electric organ discharge (EOD), the knifefish is one among a few fish that can swim backwards. Additionally, this illustration was influenced by the structural design of the specimen's tanks. Art is a method by which we interpret and respond to the world we live in. As such, the goal of this poster is to illustrate elements of the research that cannot be seen in an abstract and interesting way.

This illustration was designed in response to the research of biologist Dr. William Crampton and undergraduate researcher Alex Orfinger. Emile Kanhai's work was supervised by Dr. Joo Kim, Associate Professor in the School of Visual Arts and Design.

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From Dusts to Planets - Kristen Pauline

Bradley's research focuses on the early stage of this process, small balls of dust interacting with other loose clumps, resulting in low-speed collisions, to better understand how this results in larger planetary formation. Planets form from large accretion disks composed of trillions of dust particles, circling a star and slowly interacting and coalescing, to eventually form one large planetary body.

Kristen's poster is based on illustrating the setting and event that Bradley's research is studying. The accretion disc draws the viewers' attention to the steps illustrating the formation of planets.

This poster was inspired by the research of Dr. Josh Colwell and his student Bradley Stemm from the Department of Physics. Kristen Pauline's graphic design work was supervised by Dr. Joo Kim, Associate Professor in the School of Visual Arts and Design.

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Cholera Toxin - Jessica Carey

Chris's research is in the detection of a contaminant named Cholera toxin. CT buried by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, causes massive diarrhea. It has become a serious problem in developing countries where clean water is scarce and kills 100,00 to 300,000 people per year.

Jessica's visual response for the poster was to display the toxin in a way people would understand and relate to. The diagram of the bacterium in the intestines is displayed in a representational manner while the description is in layman's terms so that people can look past the technical terms and understand its true effects.

This poster was inspired by the research of Dr. Teter and his student Chris Britt in the College of Medicine and Biotechnology.

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The Florida Bottlenose Dolphin - Adam Boerema

Christina's research focuses on the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and their interactions with the Florida ecosystem. Christina is looking at the diet of this apex predator's feeding habits to help humans understand how different species respond to natural and man-made disturbances - such as the Deep Water Horizon oil spill (April-July 2010) off of the Gulf of Mexico.

The piece is arranged in a way that highlights the diet of this apex predator's feeding habits using artistically styled 'bubbles' containing the common prey of the bottlenose dolphin. I repeated the use of circular movement throughout the poster, creating a sense of action and connection between the predators and prey. In addition, an ocean-like color scheme with shades of blue and green is used in order to further immerse the viewer in the environment of the Florida ecosystem.

This poster was inspired by the research of Dr. Worthy from the Department of Biology and his student Christina Nagy. Adam Boerema's graphic design work was supervised by Dr. Joo Kim, Associate Professor in the School of Visual Arts and Design.

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Particle Detection in the Search for New Matter - Emily Daniels

Christopher Frye has analyzed data from a particle detector inside the Large Hadron Collider to develop methods of identifying electrons in collisions. His research plays a role in physicists' search for new particles such as the Higgs boson.??Upon collaborating with researcher Christopher Frye, I set out to capture in one piece the numerous aspects that are involved in the physics explorations at the Large Hadron Collider.

Drawing from the past, I used an image of the historical bubble chamber detection of particle collisions as a background laying the foundation for modern day experimentation. Shown as a result of the collision is Cerenkov radiation, a process that is the critical in the detection of particles in Christopher's research. I aimed to show the event of a collision itself to give the viewer a visual representation of a concept overlooked by the general population as nothing but abstract formulas and theories.

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Megan Moore

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Structural Health Monitoring - Liana Seegoolam

Evan's research is involved with the design and implementation of compact and intelligent data acquisition systems to aid in monitoring the built environment. This involves such topics as structural engineering, computer science, and heuristic based decision making. The research also seeks to explore the uses of electronic sensors, fiber optics, and wireless sensor network technologies.

Liana's goal of the poster was to visual define what structural health monitoring is. The poster features a clean and organized design that leads the eye from top to bottom. The viewer registers these images and makes a visual connection between the images and the definition of the research. The images add personality and serve as representations of the research so the viewer, at a glance, can understand the research.

This poster was inspired by the research of Dr. Necati Catbas from the College of Engineering and his student Evan Prado. Liana Seegoolam's graphic design work was supervised by Dr. Joo Kim, Associate Professor in the School of Visual Arts and Design.

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Evolutionary Optimization - Jasmin Pittito

Optimization has always being an important problem in science and engineering. Evolutionary optimization is an area of research where the principles of evolution, such as mutation, cross-over and selection, used for the evolution of species are now successfully applied to find the optimum solution of challenging problems in all disciplines.

I wanted to illustrate the importance of Charles Darwin's drawings of the evolutionary tree by recreating his drawings of animals and humans. All in all, I wanted the human head in the corner holding the evolutionary tree to show the importance of man to optimization. I wanted the ultimate feel of the poster to resemble something rather futuristic. In order to do so while incorporating all other elements, I chose to have a simple black background with a matrix-style text lining the upper half and descending down to the lower half of the poster. As you look closer at this matrix-style text, you will see that I used the letters A, C, G, and T, representing the four nucleotide bases of a DNA, while still showing the importance of the creation of computer code to Evolutionary Optimization. The double helix I used in the background is meant to indicate that Evolutionary Optimization involves the evolution of genes or chromosomes.

This poster was inspired by the research Dr. Michael Georgiopoulos and his student Giselle Borerro from the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Jasmin Pititto's graphic design work was supervised by Dr. Joo Kim, Associate Professor in the School of Visual Arts and Design.

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Acoustic Behavior of Sirenids - Emily Buehrer

Greg's research focuses on the vocalizations of sirenids. The main theme is sirenids interacting in their aquatic environment and representing their sounds with audio waveforms.

The design uses many dark colors because there is not a lot of light in the sirenid ecosystem and because sirenids are nocturnal. Three species of sirenids are represented from different distances to show different characteristics from up close and afar. Realistic depiction of the sirenids is important as they are not a well known animal.

This poster was inspired by the research of Dr. Fauth and his student Greg Thompson from Biological Sciences. Emily Buehrer's graphic design work was supervised by Dr. Joo Kim, Associate Professor in the School of Visual Arts and Design.

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Nature's Way of Converting Nitrogen to Ammonia: Biosynthesis of Iron-Molybdenyum Cofactor - Samantha Holton

This poster is primarily based on Nitrogen fixation and the process of converting nitrogen gas into ammonia. After binding with an iron molybdenum cofactor, the cofactor is formed by the movement of iron and sulfur. Based off Heena's studies, the main focus for her portion of the research is on two proteins called NifS and NifU. The specific steps are being researched currently to find out where the proteins are involved, including in the movement of iron and sulfur, and how it is supporting the Nitrogen fixation.

I wanted to display each part of the research process so far and how they are put together by being thrown into an unknown mix to equal out to the protein cluster that is formed. I kept my focus on a tree root from the soil and focus on what process happens in each individual root. I wanted to create an approach that captured these steps visually and have it be appealing to the viewer's eye.

This poster was inspired by Dr. Robert Igarashi and his student Heena Ahmed from the Department of Chemistry. Samantha Holton's graphic design work was supervised by Dr. Joo Kim, Associate Professor in the School of Visual Arts and Design.

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Predicting Change - Cailey Longhofer

Jie's research is based on Underlining function relation among variables helps scientists to better understand the everyday changes in our world. In this study, we develop formulas that dictate the behavior of approximation errors at points where a given function experiences a jump discontinuity.

The Title of the poster and the main focus point is predicting the endless changes in the world through mathematical equations and charts. Because the changes can be anything, I chose to incorporate the most familiar scenarios that the general public can relate too. These changes include: stock market jumps/spikes (why or when it will happen) and large earthquakes that cause tsunamis.

This poster was inspired by the research of Dr. Xin Li, from the Department of Mathematics, and his student Jie Liang. Cailey Longhofer's graphic design work was supervised by Dr. Joo Kim, Associate Professor in the School of Visual Arts and Design.

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Scales and Strikes: Evolutionary Relationships of Rattlesnakes - Melissa Nunes

Kelly's research involves understanding the evolutionary relationships of rattlesnakes through examining external characters and sequencing DNA. These data are used to understand the relationships between individual species as well as species groups.

My design for the poster emphasizes the evolution of the different rattlesnake species by showing a two- headed snake. The phylogeny used in Kelly's research is also highlighted, along with a fang to represent the anti-venom development resulting from the study.

This poster was inspired by the research of Dr. Christopher L. Parkinson, and his student Kelly Diamond from the Department of Biology. Melissa Nunes' graphic design work was supervised by Dr. Joo Kim, Associate Professor in the School of Visual Arts and Design.

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Compressive Sensing and Reconstruction - Cecillia Lin

Matthew's research is based on the idea of reconstructing image. Each picture is built up by numerous of pixels; by sampling random pixels on the original image, the computer can reconstruct the whole image.

I wanted to produce graphic works in two different ways: the pixels have been sampled for the reconstruction process and the sampled pixels come together to reconstruct the image.

This poster was inspired by the research of Dr. Robert Muise, from the Department of Mathematics, and his student Matthew Suttinger. Cecillia Lin's graphic design work was supervised by Dr. Joo Kim, Associate Professor in the School of Visual Arts and Design.

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TLE TeachLivE TM Motion Tracking - Kelly Vandegeer

Michael's research is based off of the The TLE TeachLivETM program where real-life teachers train through the means of a classroom simulation with virtual students. The teachers are able to walk through this virtual classroom by using an infrared camera motion tracking device that notes their position and then displays a view of the corresponding classroom position. This is depicted on the poster in the upper row of boxes with the silhouette moving from the left to right side of the classroom. The teacher can also see a student close up if he or she chooses to do so. The latter feature is presented on the poster by the lower row of boxes. The design of this poster is created primarily to focus on the motion tracking aspect of this simulation.

My poster is designed in a way to represent this information about The TLE TeachLivETM program For instance, the logo for TLE TeachLivETM was created with an apple to symbolize school, and the character there intends to symbolize either a teacher or a student. The silhouette was intentionally made as a generic figure in order to represent anyone who is a teacher. Also, the color placement and lines bursting from the center of the background serve as a way to grab and direct the viewer's attention to then flow throughout the poster.

This poster was inspired by the research of Dr. Charles Hughes from the College of Engineering and Computer Science and his student Michael Hopper. Kelly Vandegeer's graphic design work was supervised by Dr. Joo Kim, Associate Professor in the School of Visual Arts and Design.

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Termites' Contribution to Global Warming - Eric Braun

This work of art is based on termites' contribution to global warming. Termites are small insects that live and feed on diseased heartwood. The earth termites' population might outweigh the human population. Termites give off methane, a major cause to the rise of the planet atmosphere's temperature. By having an estimate of the world termites' population, we will be able to get an approximation of their contribution to global warming.

My goal for this poster was to create a piece that would accurately convey the nature of Rachel's research. This was accomplished through the use of imagery that displayed both the subject and the environment that is the focus of her work. The organic nature of the elements used is a reflection of the material that is processed by Rachel in Dr. King's laboratory.

This poster was inspired by the research of Dr. Joshua King from the UCF Department of Biology and his student Rachel Roumain. Eric Braun's graphic design work was supervised by Dr. Joo Kim, Associate Professor in the School of Visual Arts and Design.

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Pervious Pavements: A Green Solution to Stormwater Runoff - Ashley Woods

Scott's research deals with pervious pavements as a solution to stormwater runoff, and observing the effectiveness of pervious materials in different conditions. This poster is meant to educate the public about the research that is involved in testing pervious pavements in the hopes of making this world a more civil place to live.

My intention was to display the research in a coherent manner; starting with the problem, and ending with the solution. The uses of blues and greens represent the purity of the water and earth that the research aims to achieve. The use of 3D models of the different pavement tests is to demonstrate what happens beneath the soil as the water is absorbed into the earth.

This poster was inspired by the research Dr. Chopra and his student Scott Glancy from the Department of CECE. Ashley Wood's graphic design work was supervised by Dr. Joo Kim, Associate Professor in the School of Visual Arts and Design.

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Graphene Based Supercapacitors for Green Energy - Rebecca Gilbert

This research is the fabrication of graphene based supercapacitors and optimizing the synthesis parameters. Supercapacitors are energy storage devices which provide much greater energy storage than conventional capacitors. Their ability to rapidly charge and discharge makes them well suited for many applications in which batteries are too sluggish.

My poster illustrates the possible applications of these devices to green energy initiatives by representing a power grid with graphene as the backbone. Graphene based supercapacitors can be employed to improve the efficiency of harnessing wind energy, a green energy resource. Along with improving the ability to harness wind energy these devices can be utilized in smart grids thus decreasing reliability on fossil fuels.

This poster is inspired by the research of Dr. Lei Zhai from the NanoScience Technology Center and his undergraduate student Scott Matthews. Rebecca Gilbert's graphic design work was supervised by Dr. Joo Kim, Associate Professor in the School of Visual Arts and Design.

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Congenital Hip Dysplasia - Evan Travelstead

Sergio's research focuses on congenital hip dysplasia in infants. The Pavlik harness has been the treatment method of choice by orthopedists since the 1950's; it has a success rate of about 90%. The exact mechanism of dysplasia reduction, the process in which the femoral head reaches the center of the hip socket, is not understood. The goal of this research is to explain hip dysplasia reduction with the Pavlik harness and offer insight as to why reduction not always achieved. This research will hopefully pave the way to new and more successful treatment methods.

This poster is an informative illustration reflective of the current scientific research on infant hip dysplasia. It provides the viewer with a cross-section perspective into the infant's anatomy under stress, the source of the problem, and the mechanism of dysplasia reduction under the Pavlik harness. It is meant to bring light and understanding to a problem that newborns increasingly face in the current day.

This work was created in response to presentations and informal discussions with Dr. Alain Kassab, Ph.D, and undergraduate researcher Sergio Gomez while Evan Travelstead participated in the senior design class at UCF, Spring 2012. Evan Travelstead's graphic design work was supervised by Dr. Joo Kim, Associate Professor in the School of Visual Arts and Design.

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Oscillatory Magnetic Field Heat Transfer Augmentation in Ferrofluids - Patricia Miller

Stephen Guimond's research focuses on the effect of an oscillatory magnetic field on the heat transfer rate of a fluid mixed with iron particles under natural convection. Natural, buoyancy driven convection has previously been used as a means to passively cool electronics and other thermal systems and enhancement of heat transfer rates will have a large industrial impact.

My poster focuses on visual style of Stephen's results. The focus for this poster was to interpret the temperature scale that resulted from the research and computer simulations in an abstract manner. The flow of the temperature wave is meant to represent the liquid nature of ferrofluids and the colors are taken directly from the scale models used to indicate temperature related to Stephen's experimentation.

This poster is inspired by the research of graduate student Stephanie Bolyard and her student Stephen Guimond. Patricia Miller's graphic design work was supervised by Dr. Joo Kim, Associate Professor in the School of Visual Arts and Design.

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Ultraviolet Light Emission from the attachment of an electron to an ion - Natasha Glasford

A beam of electrons is shot at an Argon atom that has lost an electron, which is called an Argon ion, the Argon ion then absorbs one of the incoming electrons and ultraviolet light is emitted as the ion transitions to its uncharged state. This research focuses on a mathematical model derived from quantum mechanics that measures the minimum energy of the emitted ultraviolet light.

The poster visually illustrates the process of the charged Argon atom returning to its uncharged state. The color palette represents an array of almost metallic tones conveying the feel of energy and radiation in a physical space.

This poster is inspired by the research of Dr. Hari Saha from the Department of Physics and his student Steven Dennis; along with Dr. Costas Efthimiou from the Department of Physics. Natasha Glasford's graphic design work was supervised by Dr. Joo Kim, Associate Professor in the School of Visual Arts and Design.

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Neurofibromatosis - Kwok Yin Mak

Tiffany's research is aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms by which Schwann cells form tumors called schwannomas in the genetic disorder Neurofibromatosis type 2. Schwann cells are support cells which protect and insulate axons in peripheral nerves of the body. The insulation, known as myelin, is needed for electrical signals to travel throughout the nervous system. In Neurofibromatosis Type 2, Schwann cells have a mutation in the NF2 tumor suppressor gene that cause the Schwann cells to divide continuously, forming tumors that compress the axons in the nerves. The nerves can no longer send electrical signals so individuals begin to lose function of the muscles and senses. Most often the sense of hearing and balance is lost in those with NF2. The goal of the research is to identify drug targets for NF2 because there is no treatment for this benign tumor disorder that is often diagnosed in young adults.

My goal for this poster is to briefly explain and present Tiffany's research to the general audience. With the 3D renders of a nerve cord and an axon, viewers should be able to understand more about neurofibromatosis.

This poster was inspired by the research Dr. Fernandez-Valle from Biomedical Sciences and her student Tiffany Fabianac from the Department of Biology. Kwok Yin Mak's graphic design work was supervised by Dr. Joo Kim, Associate Professor in the School of Visual Arts and Design.

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Julia Hartland

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Polyamine Transport in Cells - Julia Motley

Victoria's research deals with polyamines. Polyamines are naturally occurring molecules essential for cellular processes such as growth and cell division. All cells synthesize polyamines, but cancer cells must also import large amounts of polyamines to sustain their rapid growth. Polyamine transport is thus a promising target for anti-cancer therapy. Unfortunately, import of polyamines into cells is poorly understood. Since the mechanism of polyamine transport is not yet understood, Victoria's research includes screening genes that may be involved in polyamine transport.

This poster is a visual illustration of the transport of polyamines into cancer cells on a microscopic level. I designed this poster with the intent to visually characterize this enigmatic biological process. The composition is an arrangement of layered textures and forms to describe depth with organic elements. Vivid colors and light were used to relate intensity and energy in the design. The dynamic placement of the essential features conveys movement within the illustration.

This poster was inspired by the research Dr. von Kalm and his student Victoria Kreinbrink from the Department of Biology. Julia Motley's graphic design work was supervised by Dr. Joo Kim, Associate Professor in the School of Visual Arts and Design.

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The Perfect Shot - Megan Moore

Will's research was to model the trajectory of a basketball to produce a successful three-point shot. Will and his teammates, Jon Lee and Adam Wearne, explored many possible routes the ball could take using a computer simulation. Their paper won a bronze medal in the national annual University Physics Competition supported by the American Physical Society and the American Astronomical Society.

My visual theme for the poster conveys a fun and creative atmosphere as seen from the eyes of a physicist. The handwritten elements and various drawings were inspired by the thinking process a scientist takes to understand a particular problem, in this case the perfect shot. This reminds us that physics and math are not only applicable to everyday life but can also change the way we see the world.

This poster was based on research by Jon, Adam, and Will and mentored by Costas Efthimiou from the Department of Physics and Mathematics. Megan Moore’s graphic design work was supervised by Dr. Joo Kim, Associate Professor in the School of Visual Arts and Design.

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