iCubed

Spring 2013 STEAM Posters

One of the objectives of ICubed is to inform the UCF Community about scientific concepts. The project is meeting this objective by funding the STEAM Gallery Initiative which is an activity that encourages STEM researchers to expand their thinking and find ways to communicate their science to non-STEM audiences. In order to best communicate STEM research conducted at UCF, ICubed created teams of two, composed of a student from a STEM discipline and a student from the School of Visual Arts and Design (SVAD). Over the spring 2013 semester, the student teams worked together to produce a poster that was visually appealing and understandable to the lay person. The final posters were presented at the State of STEAM event and later at the STEM EXPO in April 2013. The teams also had the opportunity to further show their work by entering the NSF International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge in the fall of 2013.

NSF

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No.0963146. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

UCF

Does Phenotype Affect Performance? - Amanda Rush

This illustration represents the physical attributes and characteristics of the Bahamian jungle runner (Ameiva auberi). The research I was provided dealt with the purpose of its specific structural features, which I attempted to portray as accurately as possible. I chose to represent the lizard in motion, to depict how these lizards forage for their food in their natural habitat of the Bahamas.

This work was inspired by the research of Dr. Christopher Parkinson from the Department of Biology and his undergraduate research assistant Kelly Diamond. Visual direction was managed by Dr. Joo Kim from the School of Visual Arts and Design, University of Central Florida, Spring 2013.

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Flow Analysis of a Soccer Ball in a Rotating Reference Frame - Jennifer Diaz

The purpose of this research is to further understand the aerodynamic properties for soccer balls in rotating motion. In order to show the force of the air on the rotating soccer ball I created waves of lines originating from the center of the ball outward. These lines, representing the computational fluid dynamics used to study this motion, transition from blue to yellow, showing the force of the airflow around the ball.

This work was inspired by the research of Dr. Marcel Ilie from the Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering and his undergraduate research assistant Ivan Trivino. Visual direction was managed by Dr. Joo Kim from the School of Visual Arts and Design, University of Central Florida, Spring 2013.

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The Synthesis of Novel Dyes - Lindsey Desrosiers

In order to represent the research of these novel dyes, I wanted the design to incorporate their characteristics. First, the butterflies reflect the shape of the structure that makes up the dyes and are a representation of the dyes themselves. Also, I wanted the butterflies to appear as if they are glowing to emulate the fluorescent nature of the dyes and to show what they actually look like when used.

This work was inspired by the research of Dr. Kevin Belfield from the Department of Chemistry and his undergraduate research assistant Kasey Haugen. Visual direction was managed by Dr. Joo Kim from the School of Visual Arts and Design, University of Central Florida, Spring 2013.

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Harnessing the Speed of Light - Megan Moore

The poster's visual theme is based on color and contrast. The colors of the chosen wavelengths within the crystal are highlighted through the use of selective coloring. The application of this coloring technique is employed to accentuate the purpose of the research. The goal of this poster is to expose the function of these crystals to the general population so as to inspire and educate the development of more powerful technologies.

This work was inspired by the research of Dr. Stephen Kuebler from the Department of Chemistry and his undergraduate research assistant Gabriel Padilla. Visual direction was managed by Dr. Joo Kim from the School of Visual Arts and Design, University of Central Florida, Spring 2013.

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Vaccine Derived Polioviruses: A Potential Threat to Polio Eradication - Rachel Ianni

For this poster, I wanted to visually express the process and need behind eradicating vaccine derived polioviruses. Creating an organized flow for the graphics and text was extremely important in passing along the information to the audience.

This work was inspired by the research of Dr. Linda Walters from the Department of Biology and her undergraduate research assistant Sara Bolivar-Wagers. Visual direction was managed by Dr. Joo Kim from the School of Visual Arts and Design, University of Central Florida, Spring 2013.

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Robot Motion Planning - Samantha Holton

This poster displays each part of the research's process and how it is developed in the computer. After the information is sent, it then shows how the steps are generated in the robot, so it can create it's own path to move around in the room. I kept my focus on the robot and how important it is for calculations to be correct so the robot can travel across the room safely. I wanted to create a visual that shows more of what happens after the coding is sent off to the robot.

This work was inspired by the research of Dr. Charles Hughes from the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and his undergraduate research assistant Krysten Thomas. Visual direction was managed by Dr. Joo Kim from the School of Visual Arts and Design, University of Central Florida, Spring 2013

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Presenting the Process - Andy Baumbach

This graphical representation of a research effort to improve the functionality of a medical center was derived from data elements and a simulation. I wanted to create an appealing way to show the specific process by which the researchers followed to obtain their end goal. Because the work was done for the STEM field, it was a challenge for me to understand the science behind the topic and relay it in a visual form. Relying on pure inspiration and help from my science associate I was able to come up with visual elements found in the piece.

This work was inspired by the research of Dr. Jose Sepulveda from the Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Systems and his undergraduate research assistant Tatiana Viecco-Botero. Visual direction was managed by Dr. Joo Kim from the School of Visual Arts and Design, University of Central Florida, Spring 2013.

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Theory of Everything - Emilie Finney

It was our goal to include multiple tests physicists use in one cohesive image.

This work was inspired by the research of Dr. Costas Efthimiou from the Department of Physics and his undergraduate research assistant Christopher Frye. Visual direction was managed by Dr. Joo Kim from the School of Visual Arts and Design, University of Central Florida, Spring 2013.

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