iCubed

Spring 2011 STEAM Sculptures

One of the objectives of ICubed is to inform the UCF Community about scientific concepts. The project is meeting this objective by funding the STEAM Gallery Initiative which is an activity that encourages STEM researchers to expand their thinking and find ways to communicate their science to non-STEM audiences. In Spring 2011, the ICubed team relied on the Fall 2010 STEAM experiences, to create artwork for the gallery.

Through STEAM, UCF STEM faculty researchers who received grant supplements for their students, interacted with faculty and students in the School of Visual Arts and Design (SVAD). Participating Arts and Design students attended a 3-week long seminar, as part of their course of study, and created science-inspired art based on the STEM researcher's explanations of science concepts and possibilities. In this ICubed Initiative, Visual Arts students were able to find new creative ways to communicate the science through their art. A number of artwork created during these seminars was preserved for the STEAM Gallery, a travelling exhibition displaying science inspired art. The STEAM seminars in David Isenhour's Sculpture class kicked-off with 2 presentations from UCF STEM researchers.

Dr. Debra Reinhart and her Graduate Research Assistant Stephanie Bolyard (Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering) focused their talk on Nano Materials and their various functions. Dr. Parveen Wahid and her ICubed Fellow Michael Peffers (Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science) presented their study on antenna design and analysis, electromagnetics, and microwaves. The presentations lasted approximately 30 minutes each and were then followed by a 15 minutes long interactive discussion.

NSF

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No.0963146. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

UCF

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Brown Suede - Natasha Kinsley

In both my painting and sculpture I explore the construction of amorphous shapes and planer ranges which convey implied texture and movement in contained spaces via the study of natural forms. Through my process of examining small, organic structure such as mold, rust, fungus I am magnifying, transmuting and repeating their configuration within a field. I am interested in creating an exaggerated augmentation of growths, decay and the interaction between the two to manipulate subjectivity.

This work was inspired by presentations and informal discussions with biologist Dr. Linda Walters and undergraduate researcher Kali Standorf in Fall 2010 in Assistant Professor David Isenhour's sculpture class.

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Savannah Sipos

Although the long term effect of nanoparticles on human skin or on the environment is unknown they are already being used in many consumer products, specifically sunscreen. By reversing the roles and allowing human bodies to penetrate the surface of a magnified nanoparticle, I hope to highlight society’s responsibility for creating and proliferating technology before pausing to consider all the effects it may have.

Given the rapid advancements of nanotechnology and the introduction of nanoscale materials into consumer goods, it is anticipated that nanotechnology will have profound effects on industry and technology, human health, social and economic development, and the environment. Given the growing demand for nanomaterials (NMs), it is likely that products containing these materials will be placed in landfills at the end of their useful life. Given the potential for NMs to solve many of the problems facing us today, including health issues, energy demands, and pressures on natural resources, research into the safe manufacturing, use and disposal of NMs is important.

This piece was inspired by the STEM research presented in David Isenhour’s Spring 2011 Sculpture class. This STEM research was presented by Professor Debbie Reinhart and her student Stephanie Bolyard from the Department of Civil Environmental and Construction Engineering. The presentation was titled NanoMaterials and the Environment, and its gist is summarized below.

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Michelle Davis

The piece that I created for the STEAM art exhibition is a response to the pollution of nano-particles in the planet’s water. Some types of fish have been known to change or possess both female and male genders due to pollution. With the unknown side of nanotechnology, this fish-human could be a future result of nano-evolution.

Given the rapid advancements of nanotechnology and the introduction of nanoscale materials into consumer goods, it is anticipated that nanotechnology will have profound effects on industry and technology, human health, social and economic development, and the environment. Given the growing demand for nanomaterials (NMs), it is likely that products containing these materials will be placed in landfills at the end of their useful life. Given the potential for NMs to solve many of the problems facing us today, including health issues, energy demands, and pressures on natural resources, research into the safe manufacturing, use and disposal of NMs is important.

This piece was inspired by the STEM research presented in David Isenhour’s Spring 2011 Sculpture class. This STEM research was presented by Professor Debbie Reinhart and her student Stephanie Bolyard from the Department of Civil Environmental and Construction Engineering. The presentation was titled NanoMaterials and the Environment, and its gist is summarized below.

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